University of California, Berkeley

College of Engineering

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department

Fall 2013

 

For a high-resolution vector-graphics file of the above poster, click here => Fall 2013 C145L Poster

 

Table of Contents:

 

1. Course Summary

2. Course Prerequisites, Goals, and Topics

3. Summary of Laboratory Exercises

4. Schedule

5. Course Textbooks

6. Grading Policy

7. Lab Report Format and Style

8. EECS Teaching Lab Rules

9. EECS 145L Course Responsibilities

10. Laboratory Equipment and Parts

11. Using the Digital Oscilloscope to Record Waveforms

12. Advice to the Student

13. Exams and Solutions: 1988- 2012

14. Related Courses

EECS 145M (closely related course)

 

The URL for this EECS145L web site is

http://www.EECS.Berkeley.edu/~derenzo/145L.html (last update 2013.03.20)

 

 

 

For Macintosh OS9, click on HeartModel.OS9.sit and Stuffit Expander should automatically extract the program and place it on your desktop

 

For Macintosh OSX, click on HeartModel (Mac OSX)

 

For Windows, save HeartModel.exe

 

1. Course Summary

Instructor: Stephen E. Derenzo, Derenzo@eecs 486-4097

Lecture: Mon, Wed 1:00-2:00 3108 Etcheverry Hall

Office hours: Mon, 2:10-3:00; Wed 12:10-1:00 265M Cory

Teaching Laboratory 125 Cory Hall

         Tue 9:30-12:30; Thu 12:30-3:30

Teaching Associate: Michael Eggleston, eggless@eecs.berkeley.edu

Three hours laboratory, two hours lecture per week. 3 units

Final Exam group 12: Wed Dec 18 7-10 pm

 

(University policy does not allow students to register in different courses in the same exam group)

 

First lecture Wed, Sep 4; first lab Tue, Sep 10

 

EECS145L provides practical design and laboratory experience with the electronic transducers (sensors and actuators) commonly used to measure and control temperature, displacement, force, sound, light, etc. Operational amplifiers, instrumentation amplifiers, and analog filtering are used to amplify and process the sensor signals before recording. A digital oscilloscope is used for observing waveforms and measuring voltages. Ag(AgCl) skin electrodes are used to record signals from the heart, skeletal muscles, and eyes. Applications include laboratory instrumentation, data acquisition, process control, and biomedical electronics.

 

Each lab station has a PC with the Windows operating system and software and digital oscilloscope for sampling, storage, display, and printout of data values and plots. Computer programming is not required in this course.

 

In performing the laboratory exercises, students will work in groups of 2. Please stay with the same lab partner throughout the semester. Two weeks after the scheduled date of the laboratory exercise, one lab partner will turn in to the TA a full lab report and the other lab partner will turn in to the TA only the answers to the question section. This will alternate so that by the end of the semester each lab partner will have written complete reports for five laboratory exercises and the answers to the question sections for the other five lab reports. (The lowest full lab report grade and the lowest question section grade will be dropped.) The full lab reports are expected to be complete technical reports understandable to an EECS upper division student who has not taken the course.

 

The two midterm exams and the final exam will not only cover the principles and techniques covered in the laboratory exercises and the class lectures, but will also pose problems that require new designs involving those principles and techniques.

 

2. EECS 145L Course Prerequisites, Goals, and Topics

Prerequisites

(these topics are covered in EECS 40)

Goals

Topics  

 

3. Summary of Laboratory Exercises

 

Lab 4: Operational amplifier circuits, operation of the digital oscilloscope, effect of negative feedback, measurement of gain vs. frequency

 

Lab 5: Instrumentation amplifiers for high input impedance, high-gain, differential amplification. Sources of noise, gain vs. frequency, common mode rejection ratio

 

Lab 6: Op-Amp filter circuits: one pole low pass, Butterworth two pole low pass, one pole high pass, notch

 

Lab 7: Introduction to A/D and D/A conversion (limited to students who have not taken and do not plan to take 145M)

 

Lab 11: Measuring angular position, using the microcomputer for sampling and display

 

Lab 12: Measuring temperature, thermocouple, thermistor bridge, dynamic response

 

Lab 13: Measuring strain and force, foil strain gauges, one and four element bridges

 

Lab 14: Measuring light with a PIN photodiode, optical transmission using light emitting diodes to determine the concentration of a colored solution

 

Lab 15: Using a thermoelectric heat pump. Measuring thermal efficiency and heat transfer.

 

Lab 16: Electrodes and ionic media, impedance vs. frequency, contact potential, bare metal vs. Ag(AgCl) electrodes (not in operation)

 

Lab 17: The human heart: measurement of the electrocardiogram (ECG), phonocardiogram, and blood pressure at rest and after light exercise (under physician supervision).

 

Lab 18: Recording of the electromyogram (EMG) from the fore-arm muscles, using an isolation amplifier, full wave rectifier, and low-pass filtering. Correlation of this signal with the force produced by the corresponding fingers.

 

Lab 19: Using the electrooculogram (EOG) to measure eye movement. Smooth pursuit, saccades.

 

Lab 25: Temperature Control (Analog)- Temperature sensing using a thermistor bridge and an instrumentation amplifier. Temperature control using a difference amplifier, a power amplifier, and a ceramic resistor oven.

 

Ultrasonic Rangefinder Lab:   Test an ultrasonic rangefinder and explore its ability to measure the speed and attenuation of sound in air. Determine effective range, accuracy, and beam pattern.

 

4. Schedule

 

Lectures: 3108 Etcheverry Hall

Mon, Wed 1-2 pm

 

Laboratory sessions: 125 Cory Hall

Tue 9:30-12:30; 12:30-3:30

TA and lab report grader: TBD

 

Week 1

 

Sep  2  Mon    LABOR DAY HOLIDAY

Sep  4  Wed    Course Organization

           

Week 2

 

Sep   9  Mon    Ideal and realistic op-amps  

Sep 11  Wed   Op-amp circuits - negative feedback gain equations

Lab 4 (Op-amps)

 

Week 3

 

Sep 16  Mon   Instrumentation Amplifiers

Sep 18  Wed   Noise Sources, Shielding, Grounding

Lab 5 (Instrumentation amps)

 

Week 4

 

Sep 23  Mon    Analog Filtering, Op-Amp Filter Circuits

Sep 24  Wed    Angle and Position Sensors

Lab 6 (Analog filtering) [Lab 4 due]

 

Week 5

 

Sep 30  Mon    Data Acquisition with the Pentium PC (TA)

Oct   2  Wed    Review lecture

Lab 11 (Measuring angle)  [Lab 5 due]

 

Week 6

 

Oct  7  Mon    Review lecture

Oct  9  Wed    MIDTERM #1   

Make-up Labs   [study for Midterm, no labs due]

 

Week 7

 

Oct 14 Mon    A/D and D/A Conversion

Oct 16  Tue    Temperature Measurement

Lab 12 (Measuring temperature)*   [Lab 6 due]

      students who can, please bring ice

 

Week 8

 

Oct 21  Mon    Strain Sensors

Oct 23  Wed    Measuring Force and Pressure

Lab 13 (Measuring force)    [Lab 11 due]

 

Week 9

 

Oct 28  Mon  Measuring Light; Light Sensors and Actuators

Oct 30  Wed  Electrical safety; Ionic Potentials and Electrodes

Lab 14 (Measuring light)   [Lab 12 due]

 

Week 10

 

Nov 4  Mon   EMG Signal Processing and Prosthetic Devices

Nov 6  Wed   Thermoelectric Heat Pump

Lab 15 (Peltier) or 18 (EMG)   [Lab 13 due]

 

Week 11

 

Nov 11  Mon   VETERANS DAY HOLIDAY

Nov 13  Wed   Cardiac Signals (ECG, blood press, phonocardiogram)

Lab 10 (Heart) or 25 (Temp control) or C14 (Light control)   [Lab 14 due]

 

Week 12

 

Nov 18  Mon    Review Lecture

Nov 20  Wed    MIDTERM #2

Make-up Labs   [study for Midterm, no labs due]

 

Week 13

 

Nov 25  Mon Control Systems

Nov 27  Wed EOG Signals

 

Make-up Labs  [Lab 15 or 17 due]

 (Nov 24 and 25  Thu and Fri    THANKSGIVING DAY HOLIDAY)

 

Week 14

 

Dec 2  Mon   Production and Sensing of Ionizing Radiation

Dec 4  Wed    Engineering Design Issues

Lab 19 (EOG) or 25 (Temp control) [Lab 18 or C14 due]

 

Week 15

 

Dec   9  Mon    Review for Final (Selected problems solved)

Dec 11  Wed    Last lecture (Review of topics covered)

Make-up Labs

 

Labs Closed after Dec 13   [Lab 19 or 25 due**]

        ** make arrangements to give to TA

 

FINAL EXAM Wed Dec 18 7-10 pm

 

5. Course Textbooks 

Required:

Stephen E. Derenzo, Practical Interfacing for the Laboratory, Cambridge University Press edition, 2003. Purchase from ASUC or Amazon.com.

 

Data sheets from focus.ti.com (Texas Instruments)

Burr Brown 3656 isolation amplifier (look for technical documents as .pdf files)

 

Data sheets from www.national.com (National Semiconductor)

LF356 monolithic JFET operational amplifier

LF198 sample-and-hold amplifier

LM12 80-W op amp

 

Data sheets from www.analog.com (Analog Devices)

AD622 instrumentation amplifier

AD590 temperature transducer

 

Data sheets from www.hamamatsu.com (Hamamatsu Photonics)

S3071 PIN photodiode

C5658 avalanche photodiode module

 

Gauge catalog from www.blh.com (select "download gauge") (Vishay BLH)

Description of all strain gauge and resistor series

Technical data of all strain gauge and resistor series

 

Related Texts (not required):

Paul Horowitz and Winfield Hill, The Art of Electronics, Cambridge University Press, Second Edition, 1989.

 

Glenn M. Glasford, Analog Electronic Circuits, Prentice-Hall, New Jersey, 1986

 

Robert G. Irvine, Operational Amplifier Characteristics and Applications, Prentice-Hall, New Jersey, 1981

 

George C. Barney, Intelligent Instrumentation, Prentice-Hall, 1985 or 1988

At ASUC bookstore

 

D.H. Sheingold, Transducer Interfacing Handbook, Analog Devices, Norwood, MA, 1981.

At ASUC bookstore.

 

Cobbold, Transducers for Biomedical Measurements, John Wiley & Sons, 1974

At ASUC Bookstore- required for EECS 145A

 

M. Rudd, Basic Concepts of Cardiovascular Physiology, Hewlett-Packard Co., Waltham MA (out of print).

 

6. Grading Policy 

 

40% - Four full written lab reports (including question section) from each student, due according to the course schedule on the last page (five are assigned- lowest grade dropped). Lab partners will write full reports for alternate laboratory exercises.

 

10% - Four short written lab reports (question section only) from each student, due according to the course schedule on the last page (five are assigned- lowest grade dropped). Lab partners will write short reports for alternate laboratory exercises.

 

10% - Laboratory attendance and participation (as observed by TA)

 

20% - Two midterm written examinations (closed book, in class)

 

20% - Final written examination (closed book, exam group 22)

 

Standards for laboratory participation grades are as follows (max 100):

100 for excellent effort beyond the call of duty

90 for putting in the required time and affort

80 for attending but doing significantly less than a fair share of the lab work

<80 as fits the situation

 

For both full and short reports, three points will be deducted for each school day late (no deductions for weekends or holidays). No credit for lab reports turned after the graded reports have been handed back to the students (usually 1-2 weeks after they are due).

 

The two midterm exams and the final exam include design problems that require the student to apply the principles learned in the laboratory exercises and lectures to new design situations.

 

Final letter grades are determined from the total course scores of the undergraduate students only. Then the graduate student letter grades are determined using the same standard. Otherwise, the graduate students taking the course (who generally have better numerical scores) would cause all students to get lower letter grades.

 

Final letter grades are determined using the following guidelines:

1) Undergraduate grade average 2.9.

2) Each letter grade (A, A-, B+, B, B-, etc.) is assigned to approximately equal numerical bands of total course scores.

 

 

Return to table of contents

 

 

7. Lab Report Format and Style

 

Both full and short lab reports are to be prepared on 8.5 x 11 inch paper stapled together, including the raw data (or a copy). It is not necessary to use a bound notebook to record your lab data or write your lab report. For each laboratory exercise, one lab partner will prepare a full written lab report (including the question section) and the other lab partner will prepare a short written lab report (question section only). This pattern will alternate for each laboratory exercise so that each student will prepare five full written lab reports their lab partner will prepare five different full lab reports.

 

Throughout your professional career you will be required to write internal reports, papers for research journals, proposals, grant applications, etc. To prepare you for these tasks, one of the purposes of this course to improve your skills in the area of written technical communication.

 

On the first page of your report, write (1) your name (identified as the author), (2) lab section day and time, (3) lab station number, and (4) the name of your lab partner. Three points will be deducted if this information is not present. To make your report easier to grade, number all parts tro correspond to the numbering scheme in the text.

 

Each full laboratory report will be graded on the basis of 100 points and each short laboratory report will be graded on the basis of 25 points. If you want to know how many points were deducted from each section, also include a table with entries for set-up, data and program, analysis, discussion, questions, clarity, and total grade. At the end of the semester, the lowest full lab report and short lab report grades will be dropped.

Following are the major lab report sections (100 points total):

Lateness: Three points deducted for each school day late. Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays do not count.

 

Set-up: A simple block diagram of the experimental setup you used with all essential equipment labeled. A photocopy of the appropriate diagrams from the course book could be included, with any modifications that you made to do the lab exercise.

 

 

Procedure and Data Summary: A clear presentation of your data and how you took it for each procedure section, with uncertainties, as you would find in a published technical journal article. (The "Raw Data" section below would be complete, but need not be as clear or as organized.) Any special or unusual experimental circumstances should be mentioned. This section should contain all the information specified in the textbook and required for the Analysis section without requiring reference to the "Raw Data" section.

 

Analysis: A clear description of how you analyzed the data and the results of your analysis. Include typical error propagation from raw measurements to analyzed quantities. In almost all cases the description will refer to tables and graphs. Remember to label the axes of all graphs with numbers and units, and provide a short title for each graph. Whenever possible, compare the analyzed results with numerical expectations. Reference background material, (e.g. equations from the textbook or numbers from manufacturers data sheets) as appropriate.

 

Discussion and Conclusions: Draw conclusions from your observations, data, and analysis. This section should total at least 500 words (1 page single space typed, 2 pages handwritten) and address the following points:

 

1) The principles demonstrated in each procedure section. Often this only requires stating what is obvious to you, but not necessarily obvious to a colleague reading your report who has not done the laboratory exercise.

 

2) Compare the results of different procedure sections (whenever appropriate)

For example, in Laboratory Exercise 4 compare the bandwidth of the gain = 100 amplifiers with the unity gain buffer amplifier.

 

3) Compare your observations to what you would expect. (Why did you observe what you did?) If a mathematical model is used to describe the behavior of the system, describe how well it agreed with your measurements and give possible reasons for any disagreement.

 

 

4) Discuss general situations where the principles and techniques demonstrated in the laboratory exercise could be used.

 

For example, in Laboratory Exercise 15, discuss how the thermoelectric heat pump might be used in push-pull temperature control.

 

5) Discuss the major components used in the laboratory exercise and the role each played.

 

6) Discuss limitations of the laboratory exercise and how they can be reduced by changing the method or the equipment. For example, in Laboratory Exercise 11, discuss how the accuracy could be improved by using a digital rotary encoder. Or in Laboratory Exercise 15, discuss how the maximum and minimum equilibrium temperatures could be changed by using thermal insulation.

 

Questions: (25 points) Answer all questions posed in the textbook. Any questions answered in the body of the report can be referred to by section number.

 

Raw Data: Notes and data taken in ink during the laboratory exercise and the source of the manually taken data for the "Data Summary" section (equivalent to a laboratory "log book"). If you make an error, draw a single line through it. Processed data presented as raw data is a misrepresentation. Special experimental circumstances should be noted on these sheets during the lab period. Include any computer printout of raw data. Include estimates of experimental uncertainties in your raw measurements.

 

 

Clarity of organization; neatness: Your finished report should be clear and understandable to your professional colleagues (in your case the average upper division EE student who has not taken 145L). Use numbered section and sub-section headings (as suggested in the 145L textbook) so that your grader can keep track of the organization. Provide a short title for each figure so the reader knows what is being presented without having to read the entire report. Although many students prepare their reports on word processors and laser printers, the same material written by hand will get the same grade, provided that it can easily be read. (If your handwriting is difficult to read, learn to print!) All computer printout should be cut to 8.5 x 11 inches and attached so that it can be read as easily as any other page.

 

If you want to know how many points were deducted from each section, also include a table with entries for lateness, set-up, analysis, discussion, questions, clarity, and total grade.

 

IMPORTANT NOTES:

 

Photocopy your lab report before you turn it in. The typical lab report is 15 pages and the copy centers around campus charge about $0.08 per page - $1.20 is good insurance against a lost lab report. We will not excuse a lost lab report.

 

To turn in late lab reports, ask the instructor or the staff in 231 Cory to date and sign the lab report- then if possible, deliver it to the TA.

 

If you cannot get the lab exercise to work after two lab sessions, get the data from another lab group and note it in your lab report. It is better to take a small point deduction than to fall behind in your lab work.

 

8. EECS Teaching Lab Rules

 

Laboratory Equipment Use Warnings

 

9. EECS 145L Course Responsibilities

INSTRUCTOR

ELECTRONIC SUPPORT GROUP (ESG)

TEACHING ASSOCIATE (TA)

LAB SITTERS

STUDENTS

10. Laboratory Equipment and Parts

 

 

See the following for a detailed list of required equipment and parts for each Laboratory Exercise.

 

Equipment at each Lab Station

Equipment in the Steel Cabinets

Circuit Board

1)    Superstrip circuit boards mounted on a metal plate- four binding posts are provided: ground (connected to metal plate), +5 V, +12 V, -12 V

2)     

Integrated Circuits

   Lab Exercise:   4   5   6  11  12  13  14  15  17  18  19  25

LF356 Op Amp       3       5               2           3

AD625 or LH0036        1           1   1                       2

1N914 diode                                            2

Resistors (trimpots)

   Lab Exercise:   4   5   6  11  12  13  14  15  17  18  19  25

200 ohm                                3               

10 kohm                                    2    

20 kohm            3   1           1       1           5       1

100 kohm               1           1   1                       2

Resistors (10% carbon)

   Lab Exercise:   4   5   6  11  12  13  14  15  17  18  19  25

51 ohm                         1                       

100 ohm                1                                       1

330 ohm                                1                       

510 ohm                1           1   1                       1

1 kohm             6   2                               2       

2.4 kohm                           3                           2

3.3 kohm               1           1   1                       2

 

5.1 kohm               1   1                           3       2

10 kohm                2   7               2           3      

20 kohm                    1           2                       

33 kohm                    1       1   1                       2

100 kohm           3       1                           1        

1 Mohm                 2   4       2       2                  

2 Mohm                     2

10 Mohm            1                                           

Capacitors

   Lab Exercise:      4   5   6  11  12  13  14  15  17  18  19  25

10 uF electrolytic*   2   2   3       3   3   3           4       5

1 uF electrolytic                                         1   

3.3 uF electrolytic                                       1      

0.1 uF CK05**         6   2  10       2   2   4           6       4

150 pF                        2                                

1200 pF                       2               1     

2700 pF                       1                     

0.011 uF                      1                      

0.015 uF                      2                      

0.022 uF                      1                                                                        

*Power filtering- mount on binding posts of your circuit board

**Power filtering- place between Vcc and ground at all integrated circuit chips

 

11. Using the Digital Oscilloscope to Record Waveforms

1. INTRODUCTION

The instructions below describe how to use LabVIEW Signal Express to transfer data from the digital oscilloscope to the computer and print waveforms.

 

2. CAPTURING AND PRINTING THE WAVEFORM

1) Connect the oscilloscope to the signal generator, turn both on (Signal Express needs a waveform to start)

2) Find Signal Express on desktop or start menu under Programs/National Instruments/LabVIEW Signal Express/LabVIEW Signal Express

3)With the oscilloscope providing a signal, launch Signal Express

4) If the request for license appears, press continue, and then bypass the launch splash screen.

5) Add Step

      - Select Acquire Signal

      - IVI Acquire

      - IVI Scope Acquire

      - Once the Step Setup Tab appears select the appropriate entry for the oscilloscope from the pulldown menu labeled IVI Session Name and waiting for equipment initializing

      - Make sure that both analog channels are enabled and have appropriate parameters

6) Select the Data view (the black screen)

      Drag the signals onto the Data View

      Drag both the signals from the IVI Scope Acquire Step on the left onto the black screen

7) Run one step

8) For printing it is easier to view it with white background so you can just drag the signals onto the right most tab labeled Project Documentation

9) Modify and edit the data

      - Right click on the display to pull down the menu:

           View As for display XY format

           Visible for edit legend, cursors

10) You can print the Data View or the Project Documentation by File/Print command

 

 

12. Advice to the Student

 

 

13. EECS 145L Final Exams and Solutions

 

The following files can be read with the Adobe Acrobat Reader, which can be downloaded free from the Adobe Systems Incorporated Home Page

 

145L equation sheet (handed out before exams)

 

EECS 145L 2013 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2013 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2013 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2013 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2013 final exam

EECS 145L 2013 final exam solutions

 

 

EECS 145L 2012 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2012 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2012 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2012 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2012 final exam

EECS 145L 2012 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 2011 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2011 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2011 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2011 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2011 final exam

EECS 145L 2011 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 2010 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2010 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2010 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2010 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2010 final exam

EECS 145L 2010 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 2009 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2009 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2009 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2009 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2009 final exam

EECS 145L 2009 final exam solutions

 

 

EECS 145L 2008 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2008 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2008 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2008 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2008 final exam

EECS 145L 2008 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 2007 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2007 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2007 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2007 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2007 final exam

EECS 145L 2007 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 2006 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2006 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2006 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2006 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2006 final exam

EECS 145L 2006 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 2005 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2005 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2005 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2005 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2005 final exam

EECS 145L 2005 final exam solutions

 

 

EECS 145L 2004 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2004 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2004 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2004 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2004 final exam

EECS 145L 2004 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 2003 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2003 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2003 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2003 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2003 final exam

EECS 145L 2003 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 2002 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2002 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2002 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2002 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2002 final exam

EECS 145L 2002 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 2001 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2001 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2001 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2001 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2001 final exam

EECS 145L 2001 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 2000 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 2000 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 2000 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 2000 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 2000 final exam

EECS 145L 2000 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 1999 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 1999 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 1999 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 1999 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 1999 final exam

EECS 145L 1999 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 1998 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 1998 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 1998 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 1998 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 1998 final exam

EECS 145L 1998 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 1997 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 1997 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 1997 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 1997 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 1997 final exam

EECS 145L 1997 final exam solutions

 

 

EECS 145L 1996 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 1996 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 1996 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 1996 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 1996 final exam

EECS 145L 1996 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 1995 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 1995 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 1995 final exam

EECS 145L 1995 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 1994 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 1994 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 1994 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 1994 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 1994 final exam

EECS 145L 1994 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 1993 Midterm #1

EECS 145L 1993 Midterm #1 solutions

EECS 145L 1993 Midterm #2

EECS 145L 1993 Midterm #2 solutions

EECS 145L 1993 final exam

EECS 145L 1993 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 1992 final exam

EECS 145L 1992 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 1991 final exam

EECS 145L 1991 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 1990 final exam

EECS 145L 1990 final exam solutions

 

EECS 145L 1988 Midterm

EECS 145L 1988 Midterm solutions

 

14. Related Courses

 

EECS 20: INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING. Hands-on introduction to discrete real-time systems for audio and image processing. Sinusoids, filtering, use of superposition, sampling and quantization artifacts. Workstation simulation of tone generation and detection, voice and video processing, and image processing. Real-time processing of tones, audio, and music using programmable digital signal processors.

 

EECS 40: INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. Passive circuit analysis, analog building blocks and analog systems, digital building blocks and digital systems, semiconductor devices, electronic circuits (PREREQUISITE FOR 145L).

 

EECS 43: INTRODUCTORY ELECTRONICS LAB. Equipment and laboratory technique using the oscilloscope, power supplies, multimeter, curve tracer, spectrum analyzer, and LCR bridge.

 

EECS 104: LINEAR AND NONLINEAR CIRCUITS. Kirchhoff's Laws. Telegen's theorem. Circuit elements (including op amps). Simple nonlinear circuits. General network analysis. Sinusoidal steady-state analysis. Laplace transform. Convolution. Network theorems. Natural frequencies. Stability. Network functions: poles and zeros; magnitude and phase. Two-ports. Filter approximation, synthesis, sensitivity.

 

EECS 105: ANALOG DEVICES. Physics and modeling of semiconductor devices, including diodes, MOSFETs, and bipolar transistors. Digital circuit concepts and logic gates are introduced. MOS and bipolar small-signal amplifiers are discussed in depth, including differential pairs, current-source biasing, and two-stage operational amplifiers. Frequency response and the analysis of feedback are also covered.

 

ME 135: DESIGN OF MICROPROCESSOR-BASED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS. Use of microprocessors to control machine activities, acquire and analyze data, and interact with operators. The architecture of microprocessors is related to problems in mechanical systems through study of systems, including electro-mechanical components, thermal components, and a variety of instruments. Laboratory exercises lead through studies of different levels of software.

 

 

 

EECS 125: INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS. An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, sensing and the programming of robots. Proximity, tactile, and force sensing.

 

EECS 128: FEEDBACK CONTROL. Analysis and synthesis of continuous and sampled-data linear feedback control systems. Advantages of feedback. Design by root locus, frequency response, and state space methods, with a comparison of techniques. Case studies.

 

EECS 140: LINEAR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS. Frequency response of cascaded amplifiers, dominant-pole techniques, gain-bandwidth exchange. Feedback amplifiers, 2-port formulation, source, load and feedback loading, broad-band amplifiers, feedback regulators. Switched-capacitor filters. Electrical noise and minimum detectable signals.

 

EECS 145A: SENSORS, ACTUATORS AND ELECTRODES (seldom offered). Fundamental principles related to the sources, measurements and significances of physiological parameters and variables. Covers a wide variety of transducers for light, heat, position, pressure, acceleration, radiation, ionic concentration and diffusion, medical imaging, etc. Mathematical modeling, signal to noise considerations.

 

EECS 145B: COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE. Use of digital computers for data analysis, including statistical significance of population differences, least squares and Chi squared fitting, Fast Fourier Transforms, Image theory, Computed Tomography (X-ray, SPECT, PET, and NMR). Field trips to medical research centers.

 

EECS 145M (SPRING) MICROCOMPUTER INTERFACING LABORATORY. Laboratory Exercises using the programming language C, a parallel interface port, digital timers, Instrumentation amplifiers, analog filters, S/H amplifiers, A/D and D/A converters for data processing and acquisition, Fast Fourier Transforms, least squares fitting, display, and control.

 

EECS 192: MECHATRONC DESIGN LABORATORY. Design project course. Small teams of students design and build a small-scale system with sensors, actuators, and intelligence, such as a mobile robot.

 

ENGINEERING 190: TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION. Principles of technical communication. Organizing material; developing a clear, economical style; using proper formats and rhetorical strategies. Practice in oral presentations to technical and non-technical audiences.