Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

A Context Menu for the Real World: Controlling Physical Appliances Through Head-Worn Infrared Targeting

Yu-Hsiang Chen, Ben Zhang, Claire Tuna, Yang Li, Edward A. Lee and Björn Hartmann

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2013-200
December 10, 2013

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2013/EECS-2013-200.pdf

We introduce a novel method for selecting and controlling smart appliances in physical spaces through a head-worn computing device with near-eye display and wireless communication. We augment a commercial wearable computing device, Google Glass, with a narrow-beam IR emitter for this purpose. This configuration yields a usable beam width of 2 to 4 feet (60 to 120cm) for targeting at room scale. We describe a disambiguation technique if infrared targeting hits multiple targets simultaneously. A target acquisition study with 14 participants shows that selection using head orientation with our device outperforms list selection on a wearable device. We also report qualitative data from using our device to control multiple appliances in a smart home scenario.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Chen:EECS-2013-200,
    Author = {Chen, Yu-Hsiang and Zhang, Ben and Tuna, Claire and Li, Yang and Lee, Edward A. and Hartmann, Björn},
    Title = {A Context Menu for the Real World: Controlling Physical Appliances Through Head-Worn Infrared Targeting},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2013},
    Month = {Dec},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2013/EECS-2013-200.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2013-200},
    Abstract = {We introduce a novel method for selecting and controlling smart appliances in physical spaces through a head-worn computing device with near-eye display and wireless communication. We augment a commercial wearable computing device, Google Glass, with a narrow-beam IR emitter for this purpose. This configuration yields a usable beam width of 2 to 4 feet (60 to 120cm) for targeting at room scale. We describe a disambiguation technique if infrared targeting hits multiple targets simultaneously. A target acquisition study with 14 participants shows that selection using head orientation with our device outperforms list selection on a wearable device. We also report qualitative data from using our device to control multiple appliances in a smart home scenario.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Chen, Yu-Hsiang
%A Zhang, Ben
%A Tuna, Claire
%A Li, Yang
%A Lee, Edward A.
%A Hartmann, Björn
%T A Context Menu for the Real World: Controlling Physical Appliances Through Head-Worn Infrared Targeting
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2013
%8 December 10
%@ UCB/EECS-2013-200
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2013/EECS-2013-200.html
%F Chen:EECS-2013-200