Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

A Practical Ontology Framework for Static Model Analysis

Ben Lickly, Charles Shelton, Elizabeth Latronico and Edward A. Lee

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2011-33
April 26, 2011

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2011/EECS-2011-33.pdf

In embedded software, there are many reasons to include concepts from the problem domain during design. Not only does doing so make the software more comprehensible to those with domain understanding, it also becomes possible to check that the software conforms to correctnesses crite- ria expressed in the domain of interest. Here we present a unified framework that enables users to create ontolo- gies representing arbitrary domains of interest as well as analyses over those domains. These analyses may then be run against software specifications, encapsulated as models, checking that they are sound with respect to the given on- tology. Our approach is general, in that our framework is agnostic to the semantic meaning of the ontologies that it uses and does not privilege the example ontologies that we present here. Where practical use-cases and principled the- ory exist, we provide for the expression of certain patterns of infinite ontologies and ontology compositions. In this paper we present two overarching patterns of infinite ontologies: those containing values, and those containing ontologies re- cursively. We show how these two patterns map on to use cases of unit systems and structured data types, and show how these can be used over cyber-physical systems examples drawn from automotive and avionic domains. Despite the range of ontologies and analyses that we present here, we see user-built ontologies as a key feature of our approach.

Author Comments: Following section 8.1.9 (pg. 56) of the IEEE PSPB Operations Manual we make the following statement: "This work has been submitted to the IEEE for possible publication. Copyright may be transferred without notice, after which this version may no longer be accessible."

For published version, see http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/862.html


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Lickly:EECS-2011-33,
    Author = {Lickly, Ben and Shelton, Charles and Latronico, Elizabeth and Lee, Edward A.},
    Title = {A Practical Ontology Framework for Static Model Analysis},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2011},
    Month = {Apr},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2011/EECS-2011-33.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2011-33},
    Note = {Following section 8.1.9 (pg. 56) of the IEEE PSPB Operations Manual we make the following statement: "This work has been submitted to the IEEE for possible publication. Copyright may be transferred without notice, after which this version may no longer be accessible."

<p>For published version, see <a href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/862.html">http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/862.html</a>},
    Abstract = {In embedded software, there are many reasons to include concepts from the problem domain during design. Not only does doing so make the software more comprehensible to those with domain understanding, it also becomes possible to check that the software conforms to correctnesses crite- ria expressed in the domain of interest. Here we present a unified framework that enables users to create ontolo- gies representing arbitrary domains of interest as well as analyses over those domains. These analyses may then be run against software specifications, encapsulated as models, checking that they are sound with respect to the given on- tology. Our approach is general, in that our framework is agnostic to the semantic meaning of the ontologies that it uses and does not privilege the example ontologies that we present here. Where practical use-cases and principled the- ory exist, we provide for the expression of certain patterns of infinite ontologies and ontology compositions. In this paper we present two overarching patterns of infinite ontologies: those containing values, and those containing ontologies re- cursively. We show how these two patterns map on to use cases of unit systems and structured data types, and show how these can be used over cyber-physical systems examples drawn from automotive and avionic domains. Despite the range of ontologies and analyses that we present here, we see user-built ontologies as a key feature of our approach.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Lickly, Ben
%A Shelton, Charles
%A Latronico, Elizabeth
%A Lee, Edward A.
%T A Practical Ontology Framework for Static Model Analysis
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2011
%8 April 26
%@ UCB/EECS-2011-33
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2011/EECS-2011-33.html
%F Lickly:EECS-2011-33