Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Running with Flapping Wings

Kevin Peterson

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2010-76
May 14, 2010

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2010/EECS-2010-76.pdf

DASH+Wings is a small hexapedal winged robot derived from the Dynamic Autonomous Sprawled Hexapod (DASH). Drawing inspiration from nature, DASH+Wings uses wing assisted running to enable increased mobility. It shows a great improvement over DASH in its ability to traverse smooth inclines. To understand the differences in the motion of DASH and DASH+Wings, they are fitted with the GINA mote, a small electronics package that contains a processor, IMU, and radio. The acceleration, velocity and position profile as the robots are running can be compared, and the differences in motion quantified. The accelerometer data can also be used to classify good versus poor running performance, and assist with proper tuning of the system.

Advisor: Ronald S. Fearing


BibTeX citation:

@mastersthesis{Peterson:EECS-2010-76,
    Author = {Peterson, Kevin},
    Editor = {Fearing, Ronald S. and Full, Robert},
    Title = {Running with Flapping Wings},
    School = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2010},
    Month = {May},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2010/EECS-2010-76.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2010-76},
    Abstract = {DASH+Wings is a small hexapedal winged robot derived from the Dynamic Autonomous Sprawled Hexapod (DASH).  Drawing inspiration from nature, DASH+Wings uses wing assisted running to enable increased mobility.  It shows a great improvement over DASH in its ability to traverse smooth inclines.  To understand the differences in the motion of DASH and DASH+Wings, they are fitted with the GINA mote, a small electronics package that contains a processor, IMU, and radio.  The acceleration, velocity and position profile as the robots are running can be compared, and the differences in motion quantified.  The accelerometer data can also be used to classify good versus poor running performance, and assist with proper tuning of the system.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Thesis
%A Peterson, Kevin
%E Fearing, Ronald S.
%E Full, Robert
%T Running with Flapping Wings
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2010
%8 May 14
%@ UCB/EECS-2010-76
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2010/EECS-2010-76.html
%F Peterson:EECS-2010-76