Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Evaluating Architectures for Application-Specific Parallel Scientific Computing Systems

Mark Murphy, Kurt Keutzer, Leonid Oliker, Chris Rowen and John Shalf

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2008-13
February 12, 2008

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2008/EECS-2008-13.pdf

In this work, we examine the computational efficiency of scientific applications on three high-performance-computing systems based on processors of varying degrees of specialization: an x86 server processor, the AMD Opteron; a more specialized System-on-Chip solution, the BlueGene/L and BlueGene/P; and a configurable embedded core, the Tensilica Xtensa. We use the atmospheric component of the global Community Atmospheric Model to motivate our study by defining a problem that requires exascale-class computing performance currently beyond the capabilities of existing systems. Significant advances in power-efficiency are necessary to make such a system practical to field.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Murphy:EECS-2008-13,
    Author = {Murphy, Mark and Keutzer, Kurt and Oliker, Leonid and Rowen, Chris and Shalf, John},
    Title = {Evaluating Architectures for Application-Specific Parallel Scientific Computing Systems},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2008},
    Month = {Feb},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2008/EECS-2008-13.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2008-13},
    Abstract = {In this work, we examine the computational efficiency of scientific applications on three high-performance-computing systems based on processors of varying degrees of specialization: an x86 server processor, the AMD Opteron; a more specialized System-on-Chip solution, the BlueGene/L and BlueGene/P; and a configurable embedded core, the Tensilica Xtensa. We use the atmospheric component of the global Community Atmospheric Model to motivate our study by defining a problem that requires exascale-class computing performance currently beyond the capabilities of existing systems. Significant advances in power-efficiency are necessary to make such a system practical to field.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Murphy, Mark
%A Keutzer, Kurt
%A Oliker, Leonid
%A Rowen, Chris
%A Shalf, John
%T Evaluating Architectures for Application-Specific Parallel Scientific Computing Systems
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2008
%8 February 12
%@ UCB/EECS-2008-13
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2008/EECS-2008-13.html
%F Murphy:EECS-2008-13