Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Illuminac: Simultaneous Naming and Configuration for Workspace Lighting Control

Ana Ramirez Chang and John F. Canny

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2008-119
September 17, 2008

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2008/EECS-2008-119.pdf

We explore natural and calm interfaces for configuring ubiquitous computing environments. A natural interface should enable the user to name a desired configuration and have the system enact that configuration. Users should be able to use familiar names for configurations without learning, which implies the mapping from names to configurations is many-to-one. Instead of users learning the environment's command language, the system simultaneously learns common configurations and infers the keywords that are most salient to them. We call this the SNAC problem (Simultaneous Naming and Configuration). As a case study, we design a speech interface for workspace lighting control on a large array of individually-controllable lights. We present an approachto the SNAC problem and demonstrate its applicability through an evaluation of our system, Illuminac.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Chang:EECS-2008-119,
    Author = {Chang, Ana Ramirez and Canny, John F.},
    Title = {Illuminac: Simultaneous Naming and Configuration for Workspace Lighting Control},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2008},
    Month = {Sep},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2008/EECS-2008-119.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2008-119},
    Abstract = {We explore natural and calm interfaces for configuring ubiquitous computing environments. A natural interface should enable the user to name a desired configuration and have the system enact that configuration. Users should be able to use familiar names for configurations without learning, which implies  the mapping from names to configurations is many-to-one. Instead of  users learning the environment's command language, the system  simultaneously learns common configurations and infers the keywords  that are most salient to them. We call this the SNAC problem  (Simultaneous Naming and Configuration). As a case study, we design a speech interface for workspace lighting control on a large array of individually-controllable lights.  We present an approachto the SNAC problem and demonstrate its applicability through an evaluation of our system, Illuminac.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Chang, Ana Ramirez
%A Canny, John F.
%T Illuminac: Simultaneous Naming and Configuration for Workspace Lighting Control
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2008
%8 September 17
%@ UCB/EECS-2008-119
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2008/EECS-2008-119.html
%F Chang:EECS-2008-119