Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Sound Synthesis from Shape-Changing Geometric Models

Cynthia Maxwell

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2008-105
August 25, 2008

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2008/EECS-2008-105.pdf

This dissertation is about computational tools to aid in the design of musical instruments using arbitrary geometric models as a basis. In this work we develop numerical methods and software systems that simulate interacting with geometric shapes to synthesize sound. We propose a method for rapidly estimating modal parameters of a shape by using the modal information from similar shapes. In this way, we can rapidly compute the updated modal parameters of a geometric model as the shape is changing – a phenomenon not currently modeled in other sound synthesis systems. These techniques provide a new framework for interactive instrument design and create a platform for interacting with novel virtual instruments. We implement these techniques in an interactive software system to demonstrate the efficiency and compelling interactivity of this new mode of sound synthesis.

Advisor: Ruzena Bajcsy


BibTeX citation:

@phdthesis{Maxwell:EECS-2008-105,
    Author = {Maxwell, Cynthia},
    Title = {Sound Synthesis from Shape-Changing Geometric Models},
    School = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2008},
    Month = {Aug},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2008/EECS-2008-105.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2008-105},
    Abstract = {This dissertation is about computational tools to aid in the design of musical instruments using arbitrary geometric models as a basis. In this work we develop numerical methods and software systems that simulate interacting with geometric shapes to synthesize sound. 

We propose a method for rapidly estimating modal parameters of a shape by using the modal information from similar shapes. In this way, we can rapidly compute the updated 
modal parameters of a geometric model as the shape is changing – a phenomenon not currently modeled in other sound synthesis systems. 

These techniques provide a new framework for interactive instrument design and create a platform for interacting with novel virtual instruments. We implement these techniques in an interactive software system to demonstrate the efficiency and compelling interactivity of this new mode of sound synthesis.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Thesis
%A Maxwell, Cynthia
%T Sound Synthesis from Shape-Changing Geometric Models
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2008
%8 August 25
%@ UCB/EECS-2008-105
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2008/EECS-2008-105.html
%F Maxwell:EECS-2008-105