Enhanced Friction and Adhesion with Biologically Inspired Fiber Arrays

Carmel Majidi

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2007-55
May 15, 2007

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2007/EECS-2007-55.pdf

Controlling surface forces through nano/microstructure represents an important advancement in tribology. Primarily it suggests the possibility of fabricating adhesive and friction pads from a vast range of materials and processing methods, hence allowing for the production of tribological surfaces that are cheap, bio-compatible, durable, temperature resistant, and self-cleaning. Current research in this area draws inspiration from gecko lizards, which achieve rapid wall-climbing with arrays of keratinous, micron-sized fibers. This work explores the central role of the microfiber array in gecko wall-climbing and applies these insights to the development of adhesive and ultra-high friction surfaces from otherwise non-adhesive, low friction materials.

Advisor: Ronald S. Fearing


BibTeX citation:

@phdthesis{Majidi:EECS-2007-55,
    Author = {Majidi, Carmel},
    Title = {Enhanced Friction and Adhesion with Biologically Inspired Fiber Arrays},
    School = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2007},
    Month = {May},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2007/EECS-2007-55.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2007-55},
    Abstract = {Controlling surface forces through nano/microstructure represents an important advancement in tribology.  Primarily it suggests the possibility of fabricating adhesive and friction pads from a vast range of materials and processing methods, hence allowing for the production of tribological surfaces that are cheap, bio-compatible, durable, temperature resistant, and self-cleaning.  Current research in this area draws inspiration from gecko lizards, which achieve rapid wall-climbing with arrays of keratinous, micron-sized fibers.  This work explores the central role of the microfiber array in gecko wall-climbing and applies these insights to the development of adhesive and ultra-high friction surfaces from otherwise non-adhesive, low friction materials.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Thesis
%A Majidi, Carmel
%T Enhanced Friction and Adhesion with Biologically Inspired Fiber Arrays
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2007
%8 May 15
%@ UCB/EECS-2007-55
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2007/EECS-2007-55.html
%F Majidi:EECS-2007-55