Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Enhanced Friction and Adhesion with Biologically Inspired Fiber Arrays

Carmel Majidi

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2007-55
May 15, 2007

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2007/EECS-2007-55.pdf

Controlling surface forces through nano/microstructure represents an important advancement in tribology. Primarily it suggests the possibility of fabricating adhesive and friction pads from a vast range of materials and processing methods, hence allowing for the production of tribological surfaces that are cheap, bio-compatible, durable, temperature resistant, and self-cleaning. Current research in this area draws inspiration from gecko lizards, which achieve rapid wall-climbing with arrays of keratinous, micron-sized fibers. This work explores the central role of the microfiber array in gecko wall-climbing and applies these insights to the development of adhesive and ultra-high friction surfaces from otherwise non-adhesive, low friction materials.

Advisor: Ronald S. Fearing


BibTeX citation:

@phdthesis{Majidi:EECS-2007-55,
    Author = {Majidi, Carmel},
    Title = {Enhanced Friction and Adhesion with Biologically Inspired Fiber Arrays},
    School = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2007},
    Month = {May},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2007/EECS-2007-55.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2007-55},
    Abstract = {Controlling surface forces through nano/microstructure represents an important advancement in tribology.  Primarily it suggests the possibility of fabricating adhesive and friction pads from a vast range of materials and processing methods, hence allowing for the production of tribological surfaces that are cheap, bio-compatible, durable, temperature resistant, and self-cleaning.  Current research in this area draws inspiration from gecko lizards, which achieve rapid wall-climbing with arrays of keratinous, micron-sized fibers.  This work explores the central role of the microfiber array in gecko wall-climbing and applies these insights to the development of adhesive and ultra-high friction surfaces from otherwise non-adhesive, low friction materials.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Thesis
%A Majidi, Carmel
%T Enhanced Friction and Adhesion with Biologically Inspired Fiber Arrays
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2007
%8 May 15
%@ UCB/EECS-2007-55
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2007/EECS-2007-55.html
%F Majidi:EECS-2007-55