Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Functionalized Polythiophene Thin-Film Transistors for Low-Cost Gas Sensor Arrays

Josephine Bea Chang

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2006-42
April 24, 2006

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2006/EECS-2006-42.pdf

A low-cost electronic nose solution based on printed arrays of organic thin film transistor gas sensors is proposed. First, polythiophene organic thin film transistors are shown to be suitable for use as gas sensors. Good sensitivity to a range of gas analytes including alcohols, thiols, amines, and acids is observed down to 10 ppm. The alcohol and acid response is also reversible at low concentrations. Then, a synthetic route is demonstrated for predictably altering sensor response through the incorporation of functionalized end-capping groups. This route is used to generate an array of polythiophene sensor inks with differentiated sensor response, and effect of end-group functionality and placement are investigated. An integrated gas sensor array is fabricated using a droplet-on-demand technique as a demonstration of the possibility for low-cost manufacturing. Finally, the design of organic-based logic support circuitry for the sensor array is considered.

Advisor: Vivek Subramanian


BibTeX citation:

@phdthesis{Chang:EECS-2006-42,
    Author = {Chang, Josephine Bea},
    Title = {Functionalized Polythiophene Thin-Film Transistors for Low-Cost Gas Sensor Arrays},
    School = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2006},
    Month = {Apr},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2006/EECS-2006-42.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2006-42},
    Abstract = {A low-cost electronic nose solution based on printed arrays of organic thin film transistor gas sensors is proposed. First, polythiophene organic thin film transistors are shown to be suitable for use as gas sensors. Good sensitivity to a range of gas analytes including alcohols, thiols, amines, and acids is observed down to 10 ppm. The alcohol and acid response is also reversible at low concentrations. Then, a synthetic route is demonstrated for predictably altering sensor response through the incorporation of functionalized end-capping groups. This route is used to generate an array of polythiophene sensor inks with differentiated sensor response, and effect of end-group functionality and placement are investigated. An integrated gas sensor array is fabricated using a droplet-on-demand technique as a demonstration of the possibility for low-cost manufacturing. Finally, the design of organic-based logic support circuitry for the sensor array is considered.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Thesis
%A Chang, Josephine Bea
%T Functionalized Polythiophene Thin-Film Transistors for Low-Cost Gas Sensor Arrays
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2006
%8 April 24
%@ UCB/EECS-2006-42
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2006/EECS-2006-42.html
%F Chang:EECS-2006-42