Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Resolving BGP Disputes

Cheng Tien Ee, Vijay Ramachandran, Byung-Gon Chun and Scott Shenker

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2006-39
April 13, 2006

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2006/EECS-2006-39.pdf

The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) allows each autonomous system (AS) to select routes to destinations based on semantically-rich and locally-determined policies. This autonomously exercised policy-freedom can cause instability, where unresolvable policy-based disputes in the network result in interdomain route oscillations. Moreover, several recent works have established that such instabilities can only be eliminated by enforcing a globally accepted preference ordering on routes (such as shortest path). To resolve this conflict between policy autonomy and system stability, we propose a distributed mechanism that enforces a preference ordering only when oscillations due to these disputes occur. This preserves policy freedom when possible, and imposes stability when required.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Ee:EECS-2006-39,
    Author = {Ee, Cheng Tien and Ramachandran, Vijay and Chun, Byung-Gon and Shenker, Scott},
    Title = {Resolving BGP Disputes},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2006},
    Month = {Apr},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2006/EECS-2006-39.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2006-39},
    Abstract = {The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) allows each autonomous system (AS) to select routes to destinations based on semantically-rich and locally-determined policies. This autonomously exercised policy-freedom can cause instability, where unresolvable policy-based  disputes in the network result in interdomain route oscillations.  Moreover,
several recent works have established that such instabilities can only be eliminated by enforcing a globally accepted  preference ordering on routes (such as shortest path).  To resolve this conflict between policy autonomy and system stability, we propose a distributed mechanism that enforces a preference ordering only when oscillations due to these disputes occur. This preserves policy freedom when possible, and imposes stability when required.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Ee, Cheng Tien
%A Ramachandran, Vijay
%A Chun, Byung-Gon
%A Shenker, Scott
%T Resolving BGP Disputes
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2006
%8 April 13
%@ UCB/EECS-2006-39
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2006/EECS-2006-39.html
%F Ee:EECS-2006-39