Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Cache Performance for Multimedia Applications

Nathan T. Slingerland and Alan Jay Smith

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/CSD-00-1123
December 2000

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2000/CSD-00-1123.pdf

The caching behavior of multimedia applications has been described as having high instruction reference locality within small loops, very large working sets, and poor data cache performance due to non-locality of data references. Despite this, there is no published research deriving or measuring these qualities. Utilizing the previously developed Berkeley Multimedia Workload, we present the results of execution driven cache simulations with the goal of aiding future media processing architecture design. Our analysis examines the differences between multimedia and traditional applications in cache behavior. We find that multimedia applications actually exhibit lower instruction miss ratios and comparable data miss ratios when contrasted with other widely studied workloads. In addition, we find that longer data cache line sizes than are currently used would benefit multimedia processing.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Slingerland:CSD-00-1123,
    Author = {Slingerland, Nathan T. and Smith, Alan Jay},
    Title = {Cache Performance for Multimedia Applications},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2000},
    Month = {Dec},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2000/5321.html},
    Number = {UCB/CSD-00-1123},
    Abstract = {The caching behavior of multimedia applications has been described as having high instruction reference locality within small loops, very large working sets, and poor data cache performance due to non-locality of data references. Despite this, there is no published research deriving or measuring these qualities. Utilizing the previously developed Berkeley Multimedia Workload, we present the results of execution driven cache simulations with the goal of aiding future media processing architecture design. Our analysis examines the differences between multimedia and traditional applications in cache behavior. We find that multimedia applications actually exhibit lower instruction miss ratios and comparable data miss ratios when contrasted with other widely studied workloads. In addition, we find that longer data cache line sizes than are currently used would benefit multimedia processing.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Slingerland, Nathan T.
%A Smith, Alan Jay
%T Cache Performance for Multimedia Applications
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2000
%@ UCB/CSD-00-1123
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2000/5321.html
%F Slingerland:CSD-00-1123