Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Rapid Prototyping of Solid Three-Dimensional Parts

Sara Anne McMains

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/CSD-96-892
January 1996

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1996/CSD-96-892.pdf

Several new technologies collectively referred to as solid freeform fabrication have been developed in the last decade for use in the rapid prototyping of solid three dimensional parts. These include stereolithography, photosolidification, solid ground curing, 3D printing, fused deposition modeling, ballistic particle manufacturing, selective laser sintering, laminated object manufacturing, and shape deposition manufacturing. The prototypes they produce serve as physical models during design review, allow engineers to perform functional testing of parts, and are often used as mold patterns or positives for secondary tooling to manufacture small batch sizes. This paper describes the technologies used by each of these processes, and compares their strengths and limitations.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{McMains:CSD-96-892,
    Author = {McMains, Sara Anne},
    Title = {Rapid Prototyping of Solid Three-Dimensional Parts},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {1996},
    Month = {Jan},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1996/5410.html},
    Number = {UCB/CSD-96-892},
    Abstract = {Several new technologies collectively referred to as solid freeform fabrication have been developed in the last decade for use in the rapid prototyping of solid three dimensional parts. These include stereolithography, photosolidification, solid ground curing, 3D printing, fused deposition modeling, ballistic particle manufacturing, selective laser sintering, laminated object manufacturing, and shape deposition manufacturing. The prototypes they produce serve as physical models during design review, allow engineers to perform functional testing of parts, and are often used as mold patterns or positives for secondary tooling to manufacture small batch sizes. This paper describes the technologies used by each of these processes, and compares their strengths and limitations.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A McMains, Sara Anne
%T Rapid Prototyping of Solid Three-Dimensional Parts
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 1996
%@ UCB/CSD-96-892
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1996/5410.html
%F McMains:CSD-96-892