Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Automated Low-Power ASIC Design for Speech Processing

E. Yeo

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/ERL M95/99
1995

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1995/ERL-95-99.pdf

Recent developments in Hyper's design space exploration and high-level synthesis techniques have brought the realization of automated synthesis of memory-intensive, low-power implementations closer. This work describes the design path taken to synthesize the front end of a speech recognition chip. It starts from the Hyper high-level synthesis tool by looking at possible alternatives at the algorithmic level, as well as using suitable transformations on the control flow data graph (CDFG) representation within Hyper. The flowgraph is then mapped onto an architecture, and more power analysis provides feedback for possible power improvements. Finally, with the help of the LagerIV architectural-level tools, a silicon layout suitable for fabrication is generated.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Yeo:M95/99,
    Author = {Yeo, E.},
    Title = {Automated Low-Power ASIC Design for Speech Processing},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {1995},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1995/2916.html},
    Number = {UCB/ERL M95/99},
    Abstract = {Recent developments in Hyper's design space exploration and high-level synthesis techniques have brought the realization of automated synthesis of memory-intensive, low-power implementations closer. This work describes the design path taken to synthesize the front end of a speech recognition chip. It starts from the Hyper high-level synthesis tool by looking at possible alternatives at the algorithmic level, as well as using suitable transformations on the control flow data graph (CDFG) representation within Hyper. The flowgraph is then mapped onto an architecture, and more power analysis provides feedback for possible power improvements. Finally, with the help of the LagerIV architectural-level tools, a silicon layout suitable for fabrication is generated.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Yeo, E.
%T Automated Low-Power ASIC Design for Speech Processing
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 1995
%@ UCB/ERL M95/99
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1995/2916.html
%F Yeo:M95/99