Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Disk System Architectures for High Performance Computing

Randy H. Katz, Garth A. Gibson and David A. Patterson

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/CSD-89-497
March 1989

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1989/CSD-89-497.pdf

Because of the mismatch between I/O and CPU speeds, high performance computers have long been forced to confront the fundamental I/O bottleneck. As processing power and memory size continue to grow rapidly for micro and mini computers, they too will become I/O limited. A number of hardware and software approaches, such as parallel read-out disks, expanded storage (e.g. solid state disks), and disk striping, have been used to increase I/O bandwidth and thus narrow the CPU-I/O performance gap. In addition, new developments driven by advances in small diameter (i.e., 5.25" and 3.5" disk drives, promise very high I/O bandwidth if large numbers of devices can be organized into arrays of disks. In this paper, we shall review the state of the art in disk devices and I/O controllers, and will describe new approaches for very high performance I/O based on redundant arrays of inexpensive disks (RAIDs).


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Katz:CSD-89-497,
    Author = {Katz, Randy H. and Gibson, Garth A. and Patterson, David A.},
    Title = {Disk System Architectures for High Performance Computing},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {1989},
    Month = {Mar},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1989/6166.html},
    Number = {UCB/CSD-89-497},
    Abstract = {Because of the mismatch between I/O and CPU speeds, high performance computers have long been forced to confront the fundamental I/O bottleneck. As processing power and memory size continue to grow rapidly for micro and mini computers, they too will become I/O limited. A number of hardware and software approaches, such as parallel read-out disks, expanded storage (e.g. solid state disks), and disk striping, have been used to increase I/O bandwidth and thus narrow the CPU-I/O performance gap. In addition, new developments driven by advances in small diameter (i.e., 5.25" and 3.5" disk drives, promise very high I/O bandwidth if large numbers of devices can be organized into arrays of disks. In this paper, we shall review the state of the art in disk devices and I/O controllers, and will describe new approaches for very high performance I/O based on redundant arrays of inexpensive disks (RAIDs).}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Katz, Randy H.
%A Gibson, Garth A.
%A Patterson, David A.
%T Disk System Architectures for High Performance Computing
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 1989
%@ UCB/CSD-89-497
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1989/6166.html
%F Katz:CSD-89-497