Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Traveling-Wave-Tube Simulation; The IBC Code

I. Morey and Charles K. (Ned) Birdsall

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/ERL M89/116
1989

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1989/ERL-89-116.pdf

Interactive Beam-Circuit (IBC) is a one-dimensional many particle simulation code which has been developed to run interactively on a PC or Workstation, displaying most of the important physics of a traveling-wave-tube as shown in Figure 1, from Pierce 1950. The code is a substantial departure from previous efforts, since it follows all of the particles in the tube, rather than just those in one wavelength, as commonly done, for example by Tien et al. (1955), Poulter (1954), and Rowe (1961). This step allows for nonperiodic inputs in time, a nonuniform line and a large set of spatial diagnostics. The primary aim is to complement a microwave tube lecture course, although past experience has shown that such codes readily become research tools. Simple finite difference methods are used to model the fields of the coupled slow-wave transmission line. The coupling between the beam and the transmission line is based upon the finite difference equations of Brillouin (1949). The space-charge effects are included, in a manner similar to that used by Hess (1961); the original part is the use of particle-in-cell techniques (see, for example, Birdsall and Langdon, 1985) to model the space-charge fields.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Morey:M89/116,
    Author = {Morey, I. and Birdsall, Charles K. (Ned)},
    Title = {Traveling-Wave-Tube Simulation; The IBC Code},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {1989},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1989/1342.html},
    Number = {UCB/ERL M89/116},
    Abstract = {Interactive Beam-Circuit (IBC) is a one-dimensional many particle
simulation code which has been developed to run interactively
on a PC or Workstation, displaying most of the important physics
of a traveling-wave-tube as shown in Figure 1, from Pierce 1950.
The code is a substantial departure from previous efforts, since
it follows all of the particles in the tube, rather than just
those in one wavelength, as commonly done, for example by Tien et
al. (1955), Poulter (1954), and Rowe (1961).  This step allows for
nonperiodic inputs in time, a nonuniform line and a large set of
spatial diagnostics. The primary aim is to complement a microwave
tube lecture course, although past experience has shown that such
codes readily become research tools.

Simple finite difference methods are used to model the fields of
the coupled slow-wave transmission line. The coupling between the
beam and the transmission line is based upon the finite difference
equations of Brillouin (1949). The space-charge effects are included,
in a manner similar to that used by Hess (1961); the original
part is the use of particle-in-cell techniques (see, for example,
Birdsall and Langdon, 1985) to model the space-charge fields.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Morey, I.
%A Birdsall, Charles K. (Ned)
%T Traveling-Wave-Tube Simulation; The IBC Code
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 1989
%@ UCB/ERL M89/116
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1989/1342.html
%F Morey:M89/116