Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Implementing Prolog via Microprogramming a General Purpose Host Computer

Jeff Gee

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/CSD-88-399
December 1987

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1988/CSD-88-399.pdf

This report documents the implementation of a high performance Prolog system achieved by remicroprogramming a host general purpose computer. New microcode was added to a VAX 8600 computer to implement the Berkeley Programmed Logic Machine (PLM), a Prolog-specific architecture closely related to the Warren Abstract Machine. The mapping of the abstract resources of the PLM to the 8600 is described. Performance comparisons between this system and three other Prolog implementations are included. On average, this system performs three times better than compiled and twenty times better than interpreted systems available on the same hardware. In addition, this execution model provides 75% of the performance of the special purpose PLM coprocessor, after results are normalized to the cycle time of each machine.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Gee:CSD-88-399,
    Author = {Gee, Jeff},
    Title = {Implementing Prolog via Microprogramming a General Purpose Host Computer},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {1987},
    Month = {Dec},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1987/5870.html},
    Number = {UCB/CSD-88-399},
    Abstract = {This report documents the implementation of a high performance Prolog system achieved by remicroprogramming a host general purpose computer.  New microcode was added to a VAX 8600 computer to implement the Berkeley Programmed Logic Machine (PLM), a Prolog-specific architecture closely related to the Warren Abstract Machine. The mapping of the abstract resources of the PLM to the 8600 is described. Performance comparisons between this system and three other Prolog implementations are included. On average, this system performs three times better than compiled and twenty times better than interpreted systems available on the same hardware. In addition, this execution model provides 75% of the performance of the special purpose PLM coprocessor, after results are normalized to the cycle time of each machine.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Gee, Jeff
%T Implementing Prolog via Microprogramming a General Purpose Host Computer
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 1987
%@ UCB/CSD-88-399
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1987/5870.html
%F Gee:CSD-88-399