Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

A Comparison of Tile-Based Wire Representations for Interactive IC Layout Tools

David E. Wallace

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/CSD-84-181
April 1984

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1984/CSD-84-181.pdf

Several wire representations based on "corner stitching," a data-structuring technique developed by John Ousterhout [Oust84], are compared. Three classes of wire representation are defined: skeletal representations, which model a wire as a chain of connected line segments; purely physical representations, which model the space occupied by the material of a wire, and directed box representations, which attempt to combine the best features of the other two classes. WICRD, an experimental prototype interactive wire manipulation system based on a directed box representation, is described. Each class of wire representations has its pros and cons, but the directed box representations turned out to be more limited than expected in their ability to express the ways in which wires connect to other objects. Because of these limitations, the use of directed box representations for tile-based interactive IC layout tools is not recommended.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Wallace:CSD-84-181,
    Author = {Wallace, David E.},
    Title = {A Comparison of Tile-Based Wire Representations for Interactive IC Layout Tools},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {1984},
    Month = {Apr},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1984/5958.html},
    Number = {UCB/CSD-84-181},
    Abstract = {Several wire representations based on "corner stitching," a data-structuring technique developed by John Ousterhout [Oust84], are compared. Three classes of wire representation are defined: skeletal representations, which model a wire as a chain of connected line segments; purely physical representations, which model the space occupied by the material of a wire, and directed box representations, which attempt to combine the best features of the other two classes. WICRD, an experimental prototype interactive wire manipulation system based on a directed box representation, is described. Each class of wire representations has its pros and cons, but the directed box representations turned out to be more limited than expected in their ability to express the ways in which wires connect to other objects. Because of these limitations, the use of directed box representations for tile-based interactive IC layout tools is not recommended.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Wallace, David E.
%T A Comparison of Tile-Based Wire Representations for Interactive IC Layout Tools
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 1984
%@ UCB/CSD-84-181
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1984/5958.html
%F Wallace:CSD-84-181