Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

A Family of Simulation Programs for IC Fabrication Processes (Their Structure, Design, and Implementation)

Sharad N. Nandgaonkar

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/ERL M84/90
1984

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1984/ERL-84-90.pdf

Simulation is a powerful technique of engineering research. A methodology for the design, construction and analysis of software to simulate many related processes, both individually and in sequences, is presented. The experience from the SAMPLE software project to simulate Integrated Circuit fabrication processes is distilled in the form of principles, models and guidelines of general applicability. The goal of simulation is characterized as the substitution of real entities by computations. This motif of imitation of reality is stated as a general principle: the matching of computational resources to simulation needs and desires. The design and construction of software to realize this matching is guided by a systematic mapping between them through traditional intermediate stages like physical modelling and numerical methods. A state-variable model is used to maintain uniformity of structure and interaction at all levels in that mapping. The process sequences are represented by a diagram equally applicable in the real laboratory as well as for the simulation software. The user-interaction with the software via input and output is similarly structured to obtain a uniform handling for all processes. The application of these models and principles to the overall abstract design as well as to various practical details is illustrated using the SAMPLE software as a comprehensive example. Their use has resulted in a coherent structure for the SAMPLE family of simulation components and its documentation. Also shown is their use in analyzing and evaluating the software in its current form, its past development, new ideas for extending it, and in obtaining guidelines for future work.

Advisor: Andrew R. Neureuther and William G. Oldham


BibTeX citation:

@phdthesis{Nandgaonkar:M84/90,
    Author = {Nandgaonkar, Sharad N.},
    Title = {A Family of Simulation Programs for IC Fabrication Processes (Their Structure, Design, and Implementation)},
    School = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {1984},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1984/405.html},
    Number = {UCB/ERL M84/90},
    Abstract = {Simulation is a powerful technique of engineering research.
A methodology for the design, construction and analysis of software
to simulate many related processes, both individually and in
sequences, is presented.  The experience from the SAMPLE software
project to simulate Integrated Circuit fabrication processes is
distilled in the form of principles, models and guidelines of
general applicability.

The goal of simulation is characterized as the substitution
of real entities by computations.  This motif of imitation
of reality is stated as a general principle: the matching
of computational resources to simulation needs and desires.
The design and construction of software to realize this matching
is guided by a systematic mapping between them through traditional
intermediate stages like physical modelling and numerical methods.
A state-variable model is used to maintain uniformity of structure
and interaction at all levels in that mapping.  The process
sequences are represented by a diagram equally applicable in
the real laboratory as well as for the simulation software.
The user-interaction with the software via input and output is
similarly structured to obtain a uniform handling for all processes.

The application of these models and principles to the overall
abstract design as well as to various practical details is
illustrated using the SAMPLE software as a comprehensive example.
Their use has resulted in a coherent structure for the SAMPLE family
of simulation components and its documentation.  Also shown is
their use in analyzing and evaluating the software in its current
form, its past development, new ideas for extending it, and in
obtaining guidelines for future work.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Thesis
%A Nandgaonkar, Sharad N.
%T A Family of Simulation Programs for IC Fabrication Processes (Their Structure, Design, and Implementation)
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 1984
%@ UCB/ERL M84/90
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1984/405.html
%F Nandgaonkar:M84/90