Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

UNIGRAFIX 2.0 User's Manual and Tutorial

Carlo H. Séquin, Mark Gordon Segal and Paul Wensley

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/CSD-83-161
December 1983

http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1983/CSD-83-161.pdf

UNIGRAFIX, as the name implies, is a graphics system that runs under the UNIX operating system. It consists of a descriptive language and various programs that allow a user to create, modify, and display scenes consisting of polyhedral objects.

The UNIGRAFIX language is in a terse, human-readable format that allows scene files of complex objects to be created with little effort. These scene files may be created manually with use of a text editor, or may be output by special-purpose generator programs (for more complex scenes). Once created, scenes can be used as input to the UNIGRAFIX rendering programs. These programs can be run either as separate functional units, or from within the interactive UNIGRAFIX environment. Programs are also available to transform and display the scenes according to user specification.


BibTeX citation:

@techreport{Séquin:CSD-83-161,
    Author = {Séquin, Carlo H. and Segal, Mark Gordon and Wensley, Paul},
    Title = {UNIGRAFIX 2.0 User's Manual and Tutorial},
    Institution = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {1983},
    Month = {Dec},
    URL = {http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1983/5981.html},
    Number = {UCB/CSD-83-161},
    Abstract = {UNIGRAFIX, as the name implies, is a graphics system that runs under the UNIX operating system. It consists of a descriptive language and various programs that allow a user to create, modify, and display scenes consisting of polyhedral objects.  <p>  The UNIGRAFIX language is in a terse, human-readable format that allows scene files of complex objects to be created with little effort. These scene files may be created manually with use of a text editor, or may be output by special-purpose generator programs (for more complex scenes). Once created, scenes can be used as input to the UNIGRAFIX rendering programs.  These programs can be run either as separate functional units, or from within the interactive UNIGRAFIX environment. Programs are also available to transform and display the scenes according to user specification.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Report
%A Séquin, Carlo H.
%A Segal, Mark Gordon
%A Wensley, Paul
%T UNIGRAFIX 2.0 User's Manual and Tutorial
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 1983
%@ UCB/CSD-83-161
%U http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/1983/5981.html
%F Séquin:CSD-83-161