1. Guide to the Bachelor of Science

  1. Introduction
  2. Lower Division EECS Core Courses
  3. Upper Division Curriculum
  4. Math and Science
  5. Additional Opportunities
  6. Humanities and Special Interests
  7. Study Plan

  1. Introduction

    Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS) encompasses a very wide range of topics. Successful engineers balance a broad understanding of fundamentals with in-depth expertise in one or several topics.

    The requirements for the EECS degree give you a lot of flexibility in choosing courses. This guide helps you to assemble a personal curriculum taking into account your interests, prior experience, and goals. While objectives may change over the course of your studies, it is important to plan ahead and start with an initial draft curriculum during your freshman year. Many interesting upper division courses have prerequisites that must be taken early. Advising sessions and experience gained as you go along will help you refine this draft in the following semesters. Additional information is available from the following sources:

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  2. Lower Division EECS Core Courses

    Although engineers are becoming increasingly specialized, a broad understanding of general concepts is critical for the successful completion of engineering projects. The following set of lower division courses covers the field broadly and must be taken by all EECS students:

    1. EE 40 focuses on the physical aspects of EECS, including the devices and electronic circuits used in computers, phones, cars, etc. (Being phased out; last term offered will be Fall 2015.)
    2. EE 20 an introduction to mathematical modeling techniques used in the design electronic systems. (Being phased out; last term offered will be Fall 2015.)
    3. EE 20 and 40 are being replaced with EE 16A and EE 16B. EE 16A will be offered beginning in Spring 2015, and 16B will be offered beginning in Fall 2015. These courses will focus on the fundamentals of designing and building modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world. The course sequence provides a comprehensive introduction to core EECS topics in circuit design, signals, and systems in an application-driven context. Please note that you must complete both courses in your lower division EE sequence and substitutions will not be made.
    4. CS 61A, 61B or 61BL, 61C or 61CL concentrate on computing, including programming.

    You don't need to satisfy other course requirements before taking EECS lower-division core courses. If you have satisfied all of the prerequisites (or placed out of the prerequisites through Advanced Placement credit), we encourage you to start taking the EECS lower-division core courses as early as you can! Try to complete all five courses by the end of your sophomore year.

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  3. Upper Division Curriculum

    Upper division courses give you in-depth exposure to one or more areas of EECS. For most courses, the only condition for enrolling is having completed prerequisite courses (listed in the course catalog). Strive to balance breadth with specialization by choosing two or three areas and taking multiple related courses in each. The EECS degree requires a minimum of 20 units of upper division courses in the department and 45 units total (including upper division EECS units) in the College of Engineering, as well as an ethics requirement. Most students find that they need to take more units than the required minimum for a complete education and to maximize their opportunities for jobs or graduate school. We strongly recommend that you use the resources available to you to optimize your education.

    To help you choose from the large number of available upper division courses, the table below lists related courses for several areas. Please refer to the course catalog. for detailed course descriptions. This is only meant to be a guide; many other combinations are also possible. Discuss your choices with your faculty adviser, fellow students, and, if you have a chance, practicing engineers: your plan may have a profound impact on your future. Plan early and revise readily when you see new opportunities or your interests change.

    AREA COURSES
    Devices EE 105, EE 119, EE 130, EE 143
    Analog Circuits EE 105, EE 140, EE 142, EE 113
    Digital Circuits EE 105, EE 141, CS 150
    Computer Architecture CS 150, CS 152
    Signals EE 120, EE 123, EE 126, EE C145B
    Communication & Networking EE 120, EE 121, EE 122
    Robotics & Control EE C125, EE C128
    Laboratory & Projects EE C145L, EE 145M, or C145M, EE 192
    Algorithms CS 170, CS 172, CS 174
    Artificial Intelligence CS 188
    Databases CS 186
    Software & Languages CS 169, CS 162, CS 164
    Security CS 161
    Interface & Graphics CS 160, CS 184
    Quantum Computing CS C191

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  4. Math and Science

    Engineers use math and science as tools in their designs. The following requirements ensure that you have the necessary background:

    • Math 1A, 1B, 53, 54
    • CS 70
    • A three-course natural science sequence, including Physics 7A and 7B and one additional science course. See Section 2.2 for a complete listing of the requirements.

    You do not need to retake courses for which you received advanced placement credit (see pages 7-10 in the College of Engineering Undergraduate Guide). Check your transcript for a listing.

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  5. Additional Opportunities

    Berkeley's EECS department offers many opportunities for maximizing your engineering education beyond curriculum requirements. The department is internationally acclaimed for its research and consistently ranks among the top universities in the world. Participating in research is an excellent opportunity to gain practical experience and learn about the cutting edge of a field.

    Undergraduate research projects are in high demand, and finding one requires some planning. You can find out about ongoing projects by talking to professors during their office hours (their purpose is not only to inquire about exam grades or lost homework), attending research seminars, or checking out department web pages. Many (but not all) undergraduate research opportunities are listed at the Undergraduate Research@Berkeley website. Oftentimes you will need to have successfully completed one or more upper division courses in the area of the project, so plan ahead. See section 8.4 for additional information.

    Summer internships at companies are another excellent opportunity to gain practical experience. See section 8.8 for additional information. More information is also available at XRG Internships.

    If you are interested in a more extensive research experience and taking additional courses, you should consider the honors program. This program requires a well thought out plan and good grades, and is available only to our top students. See the EECS Honors Degree Program for more information. It is strongly recommended that you apply in your junior year or earlier. Attend an overview session before applying. See section 8.5 for additional information.

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  6. Humanities and Special Interests

    Courses outside the College of Engineering (COE) help to round out your education. You have a choice of courses in humanities, social sciences, foreign languages, physical education, and many other disciplines. You can also earn a minor from a different department in or outside the COE, or you can enroll in one of our double-major programs (currently EECS/MSE and EECS/NE). However, you are not completely free with your choices. Please see the COE undergraduate degree requirements.

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  7. Study Plan

    Please keep in mind the following when preparing your Study Plan:

    • You need to complete at least 12 units in each semester and an average of 30 units in each year. The 12 unit minimum is enforced every term except for a student's final semester at Berkeley.
    • At least two of your courses must be letter-graded technical courses.
    • Try to distribute technical and non-technical courses evenly over the semesters.
    • Carefully plan your schedule to complete your degree in eight semesters, attending summer sessions if necessary.
    • Make sure to take courses with prerequisite chains in the right order.
    • Not all courses are given in each semester and some courses overlap. Because of this you sometimes need to modify your program when the Schedule of Classes is updated.
    • Not all degree requirements are listed here. See your Engineering Student Services Adviser (ESS) in 230 Bechtel Hall periodically for a degree check to make sure you're on track.

    Here is a Study Plan Worksheet in MS Word format.

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