Electrical Engineering
      and Computer Sciences

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UC Berkeley

Information for Current M.Eng. Students

Intent to Enroll Registration and Enrollment Orientation Timeline Program Requirements by Area Capstone Projects
Common Forms Faculty Advisor Student Services Advisor Fung Institute International Students Contacts
General Information Prospective Students

Intent to Enroll

After we have notified you of your acceptance into the degree program, you need to communicate your intent to enroll in the program or to deny admission to the program by April 15. You can do this through a link sent in your admissions email.


Registration and Enrollment

The University will send you numerous emails about how to pay your tuition and fees, as well as how to enroll in courses. Look for these emails and if you do not receive emails during the months of June and July about these matters, please contact Breanne Tcheng.


Orientation

Orientation and a Pre-Semester Leadership Intensive course will take place on campus from August 11-22, 2014 and attendance is mandatory. This is an important time for the cohort to build community, receive important information, and practice vital skills for the leadership component of the program. The schedule is posted in bSpace and was also sent via email. Again, if you do not receive emails regarding this matter, please contact Breanne Tcheng.


Timeline

The campuswide Academic Calendar has all campus deadlines, holidays, and instructional dates. The list below includes specific dates for EECS MEng students.

April 15, 2014 Statement of Intent to Register Deadline
May 18, 2014 Commencement
June 2014 Capstone Project Matching, emails through EECS
July - August 2014 Registration
August 11-22, 2014 Fung Institute Orientation & Pre-Semester Leadership Intensive
August 25, 2014 EECS Department Orientation
August 26,2014 Graduate Division (campuswide) New Student Orientation
August 28, 2014 Fall Classes Begin
September 2014 Proposed Course List Form Deadline (see Common Forms)
September 2014 EECS MEng Student Event
December 2014 EECS MEng Student Event
December 19, 2014 Fall Semester Ends
January 7-16, 2015 Fung Institute Pre-Semester Leadership Intensive
January 13, 2015 Spring Classes Begin
February 2015 Advancement to Candidacy Form Deadline (see Common Forms)
April 2015 EECS MEng Student Event
May 15, 2015 Spring Semester Ends & Report Signatures Due
May 2015 Commencement

Program Requirements by Area

  Data Science and Systems

All EECS MEng students should expect to complete four (4) technical courses within the EECS department at the graduate level, the Fung Institute's engineering leadership curriculum, as well as a capstone project that will be hosted by the EECS department.

2015-2016 Capstone Projects

For the capstone projects for Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) our department believes that the students are going to have a significantly better experience if the projects are followed closely by an EECS professor throughout the academic year. To ensure this, we have asked the faculty in each area for which the Master of Engineering is offered in our department to formulate one or more project ideas that the incoming students will have to choose from. We list below the titles and faculty advisor for these capstone choices in the area. Depending on the number of enrolled students in the area, we may run only a subset of these project ideas.

Project 1 Title - Anomaly Detection for Internet Video Analytics (advisor Prof. George Necula in collaboration with Conviva Inc.)
Description - Conviva Inc. is the leading provider of Online Video Quality Analytics, managing tens of billions of online video streams each year. This vast amount of data contains not-yet-tapped information about viewer and device trends, content penetration, and network performance. Students will work as a team to build a scalable analysis and machine-learning framework that can process real-time video analytics data. On top of this platform students will develop individually or in smaller teams a number of data mining analyses. The choice of analyses is vast, and we will pick based on student interest and capabilities of the platform that we will develop. Examples are: anomaly detection (viewership pattern is different than expected, perhaps for a specific platforms or geographic area; this can signal errors in the video delivery pipeline); social analytics correlation (analyze social media, e.g., positive or negative comments about shows, and find correlations with measured quality), viral video detector (detect when a video goes viral), device/CDN/ISP performance (compare quality of delivery for various networks and devices), bitrate and encoding profile recommendation (based on measured quality for the device and the network recommend best set of bitrates and video encoding parameters), subscriber loyalty (understand subscriber retention over various user groups and how it correlates with quality), subscriber content loyalty (which content groups -- genres, artists -- bring in most loyal viewers), impact of mobile devices on engagement/retention. We will work with a large sample of real video analytics data provided by Conviva Inc., and we will use the Spark/DataBricks framework the data analysis.

Technical Courses

At least two of your four technical courses should be chosen from the list below. The remaining technical courses should be chosen from your own or another MEng area of concentration within the EECS Department.

Fall 2015 DRAFT

Spring 2016 DRAFT

Note: The courses listed here are not guaranteed to be offered, and the course schedule may change without notice. Refer to the UC Berkeley Course Schedule for further enrollment information.

  Physical Electronics and Integrated Circuits

All EECS MEng students should expect to complete four (4) technical courses within the EECS department at the graduate level, the Fung Institute's engineering leadership curriculum, as well as a capstone project that will be hosted by the EECS department.

The Physical Electronics and Integrated Circuits areas have been combined due to the many commonalities between them. Students in either area may choose from a combined set of capstone projects and technical courses as shown below.

2014-2015 Capstone Projects

For the capstone projects for Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) our department believes that the students are going to have a significantly better experience if the projects are followed closely by an EECS professor throughout the academic year. To ensure this, we have asked the faculty in each area for which the Master of Engineering is offered in our department to formulate one or more project ideas that the incoming students will have to choose from. We list below the titles and faculty advisor for these capstone choices in the area. Depending on the number of enrolled students in the area, we may run only a subset of these project ideas.

Project 1 Title - Integrative Smart Solar Optofluidics for Energy and Healthcare (advisor Prof. Luke P. Lee)
BSAC, Departments of Bioengineering and EECS
Description - In this project, we are developing digital healthcare systems for precision medicine, which will be foundation for preventive personalized healthcare by creating smartphone-based Integrated Molecular Diagnostic Systems (iMDx). This smartphone-based iMDx is automated, sensitive, specific, user-friendly, robust, rapid, easy-to-use, and portable, can revolutionize future medicine. We design low-powered and precise sample preparation and new detection methods by sample amplification and ultrafast signal transduction. This digital healthcare system holds the potential to breakthrough the number of problems brought into the field of healthcare and life sciences today.
Project 2 Title - An Analysis of On-Chip Vacuum Electronics for Grid-Scale Integrated Circuits (advisor Prof. Vivek Subramanian)
Description - In this project, students will evaluate the viability of on-chip vacuum electronics for kilovolt level switching, with the goal of realizing a technology for realizing an integrated circuit technology for smart grids. Students will review literature on planar vacuum tubes to develop models for high-voltage operation, will simulate vacuum tube structures to design candidate vacuum tubes, and will define process flows for fabrication of such devices on silicon; these will ultimately be fabricated in the Marvell Nanolab, and characterized to validate designs.
Project 3 Title - Petabit switch-fabric design (advisors Profs. Elad Alon and Vladimir Stojanovic)
Description - In this project the team will explore the circuits and architectures for building a 1000-port switch-fabric with petabit bisection bandwidth, for emerging cloud-computing applications. The fabric will consist of high-speed electrical or photonic SerDes I/O and a variety of crossbar architectures. The project will build-up the high-speed analog/mixed-signal and digital design skills as well as exposure to silicon-photonics and switch architectures.
Project 4 Title - Next generation memory interfaces (advisors Profs. Elad Alon and Vladimir Stojanovic)
Description - In this project the team will build a next generation memory controller and high-speed link interface, for 3D stacked memory chips. The project will build-up the high-speed analog/mixed-signal and digital design skills as well as exposure to internal modern DRAM organization and design trade-offs.
Project 5 Title - Productizing ABCD (Accurate Booleanization of Continuous Dynamics) (advisor Prof. Jaijeet Roychowdhury)
Description - ABCD, an ongoing research project, comprises theory, algorithms and software for approximating continuous ("analog") systems using purely Boolean representations, so that they can be verified seamlessly along with other digital systems. In this project, you will explore:
  • finding good AMS (analog/mixed-signal) circuit use cases and using ABCD to Booleanize and verify them within a system.
  • figuring out what works well in ABCD, what does not, and what additional capabilities are required.
  • a market study to figure out what the industry would really want in such a tool, and making a business case for ABCD.
  • optionally: contribute to the code and research.
Project 6 Title - Transistor Circuits for a MEMS-Based Wireless Transceiver (advisor Prof. Clark Nguyen)
Description - This project entails the design and layout of circuit blocks needed to implement a wireless transceiver that combines transistors and MEMS devices to achieve sub-50uW power consumption. The needed blocks include a sustaining circuit for a MEMS-based oscillator, an energy sensing amplifier, demodulation blocks, and a Class E power amplifier.
Project 7 Title - Computational CellScope and Computation Illumination for Upgrading an Optical Microscope (advisor Prof. Laura Waller) - this project is cross-listed with the Signal Processing & Communications area.
Description - We are building an inexpensive optical microscope based on mobile phone technology (CellScope). By implementing illumination patterning in Fourier space, we can create a computational imaging system that can image 3D and phase information. The new computational CellScope will be used for diagnosing tropical diseases in underdeveloped countries.

We are developing new methods for optical microscopy that use sophisticated image processing and Fourier optics to achieve multiple contrast modes in a commercial microscope with minimal hardware modification. We will provide super-resolution capabilities with phase imaging, so that the microscope can achieve gigapixel images with diffraction-limited resolution.
Project 8 Title - Post-CMOS circuit and logic design with spintronic/nanomagnetic devices (advisors Profs. Elad Alon and Vladimir Stojanovic)
Description - In this project the team will evaluate different circuit and logic design styles with post-CMOS Spin Transfer Torque (STT) devices, in particular Spin-Valve/Magnetic Tunneling Junction (SV/MTJ) devices. These devices operate at extremely low supply voltages (10s of mV) but have on-to-off current ratios much smaller than in CMOS (typically 3-5). The team will develop a variety of circuit techniques that leverage low-voltage operation of SV/MTJ devices while mitigating the leakage effects. The techniques will be applied to processor datapath logic as well as high-speed link SerDes. The project will build-up the high-speed circuit, low-power digital and mixed-signal design skills, as well as exposure to operation of several post-CMOS device technologies.

Technical Courses

Fall 2015 DRAFT

Spring 2016 DRAFT


Note: The courses listed here are not guaranteed to be offered, and the course schedule may change without notice. Refer to the UC Berkeley Course Schedule for further enrollment information.

  Robotics and Embedded Software

Program Requirements

All EECS MEng students should expect to complete four (4) technical courses within the EECS department at the graduate level, the Fung Institute's engineering leadership curriculum, as well as a capstone project that will be hosted by the EECS department.

2015-2016 Capstone Projects

For the capstone projects for Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) our department believes that the students are going to have a significantly better experience if the projects are followed closely by an EECS professor throughout the academic year. To ensure this, we have asked the faculty in each area for which the Master of Engineering is offered in our department to formulate one or more project ideas that the incoming students will have to choose from. We list below the titles and faculty advisor for these capstone choices in the area. Depending on the number of enrolled students in the area, we may run only a subset of these project ideas.

Project 1 Title - Wireless technology for collecting information from families on the verge of poverty (advisors Profs. Ruzena Bajcsy and Mauricio Miller and his technical personnel from fii.org)
Description - In collaboration with the Organization of Family Independence Initiative (FII.org) the CEO Mauricio Miller, who have a data base of 1,000 families across the USA, we recognized the need to facilitate these families with wireless technologies in order to monitor their social patterns of movements, connections with their peers/families, shopping patterns, health care and educational needs. The technical challenges are as follows: 1. There is a need to have flexible interface of several different mobile platforms with servers in order to collect the geographical patterns of their movements, and health signs of individual while respecting their privacy. 2. There is a need to reconcile the textual information that already exists in their database with the signal measurements that comes from the mobile devices. 3. There is a need to identify features that clusters different people so that we can use these connections for positive reinforcement of these groups to improve their lives.
Project 2 Title - Interactive remote Diagnostics of physically handicapped patients (advisor Prof. Ruzena Bajcsy, Gregorij Kurillo, and Dr. Jay Han)
Description - At UCB we have developed a Kinect (3D camera) base system, installed simultaneously in two remote places (we have demonstrated its feasibility between Spain and Berkeley, USA) that can transmit in real time video, 3D information and audio in both directions. This technology offers a possibility to perform medical diagnosis for the physician and patient not being in the same place. While we have shown the feasibility of this system, some serious studies of the usability are in order. On the technical level we need to study the effect on the communication with respect to the quality of the signal transmitted (spatial, and temporal resolution, the effect of noise, loosing packets through the network and the delay due to the network). Another aspect to study is the tradeoff between the amount of data transmitted and the amount of computation deployed, such as interpolation and extrapolation, use of a prior models on the subjects. Finally asses under what medical conditions such a video/audio communication suffices vs. face to face communication.
Project 3 Title - Sensory Fusion and Selection for Car and its driver with respect to the safe driving (advisor Prof. Ruzena Bajcsy and Katherine Driggs Campbell)
Description - We are in possession of a sophisticated Car simulator with capabilities of testing driver's ability to drive under varied road conditions. We can measure all the necessary car state/input variables (velocity, acceleration and braking, steering angles) but also to some degree the road conditions (inhomogeneity of the surface road). In addition we can measure the driver's head, shoulder, eye movements to assess how much they pay attention to the driving conditions. We also have motion capture capabilities that can simulate the outer sensors on the car which now many of the higher cost cars have The proposed Capstone project is to: 1. Model each sensors its range, spatiotemporal resolution, sensitivity, signal/noise ratio. 2. Add to the current sensors suit EMG sensor on the leg and evaluate its capacity to detect the forces during the acceleration and/or braking for individual subject. 3. Given the sensor suit and their models design a selection algorithm for different sensor or a subset of sensors depending on the road situations which will optimize the information obtained with respect to the safety on the road. 4. If time permits, add Visual signal for Car to car communication.
Project 4 Title - Application of Collaborative Robots to Two-Person Manipulation Tasks (advisor Prof. Ruzena Bajcsy and Aaron Bestick)
Description - Many tasks which could be performed by service, personal, and industrial robots would traditionally require two people to accomplish. Examples include making a bed, assembling large pieces of furniture, placing large pieces of sheet metal, drywall or other building materials, and a huge variety of other tasks. A variety of programming by demonstration (PbD) algorithms allow a single robot to learn how to perform a task based on a collection of human demonstrations. However, collaborative tasks performed by more than one person can introduce a number of unique challenges for PbD. A key problem is that many PbD algorithms do not explicitly model the motion constraints imposed by the size, shape, and flexibility of the object being manipulated. For this project, you will choose a two-person manipulation task that you'd like to train a pair of robots to accomplish. You'll collect demonstrations of humans performing the task, and apply a PbD approach to both train the robot to accomplish the task autonomously, and to explicitly model kinematic constraints imposed on the robots' motion by the object and incorporate these into the robots' motion planning. Tools available: Two Baxter robots (two arms each, cameras, joint torque sensing), One UR5 robot arm, PhaseSpace motion capture system, Other standalone sensors (IMUs, force/torque, etc.)

Technical Courses

Fall 2015 DRAFT

Spring 2016 DRAFT

Note: The courses listed here are not guaranteed to be offered, and the course schedule may change without notice. Refer to the UC Berkeley Course Schedule for further enrollment information.

  Signal Processing and Communications

Program Requirements

All EECS MEng students should expect to complete four (4) technical courses within the EECS department at the graduate level, the Fung Institute's engineering leadership curriculum, as well as a capstone project that will be hosted by the EECS department.

2015-2016 Capstone Projects

For the capstone projects for Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) our department believes that the students are going to have a significantly better experience if the projects are followed closely by an EECS professor throughout the academic year. To ensure this, we have asked the faculty in each area for which the Master of Engineering is offered in our department to formulate one or more project ideas that the incoming students will have to choose from. We list below the titles and faculty advisor for these capstone choices in the area. Depending on the number of enrolled students in the area, we may run only a subset of these project ideas.

Project 1 Title - Scalable video-on-demand with edge resources (advisor Prof. Kannan Ramchandran)
Description - In our research group at Berkeley, we have recently developed an exciting new platform (theory and algorithms) for delivering Video-on-Demand (VoD) content in a highly scalable, robust, and distributed way with the aid of peer cooperation. Our approach is based on massively aggregating the "micro-resources" of storage, CPU, bandwidth, and connectivity available at peer edge devices like laptops and tablets. We have come up with the theory and a fully distributed algorithm that figures out how each edge device should interact with the rest of the system in such a way that everyone's resources are maximally utilized.

As a concrete application of this framework, imagine being able to deliver ultra-high-def (UHD) video quality having 16x the resolution of HD video, without any investment in additional infrastructure by seamlessly leveraging the available "spare" resources at the edges. Imagine a platform that can deliver UHD video at the same cost that you pay for Netflix today: isn't that cool? While we have developed the theory and algorithm, and observed its huge potential, much work remains to make it viable and practical. We would like to push this project forward into a real deployable system and change the way that video is delivered and watched in the near future.

Technical Courses

Fall 2015 DRAFT

Spring 2016 DRAFT

Note: The courses listed here are not guaranteed to be offered, and the course schedule may change without notice. Refer to the UC Berkeley Course Schedule for further enrollment information.

  Visual Computing and Computer Graphics

Program Requirements

All EECS MEng students should expect to complete four (4) technical courses within the EECS department at the graduate level, the Fung Institute's engineering leadership curriculum, as well as a capstone project that will be hosted by the EECS department.

2015-2016 Capstone Projects

For the capstone projects for Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) our department believes that the students are going to have a significantly better experience if the projects are followed closely by an EECS professor throughout the academic year. To ensure this, we have asked the faculty in each area for which the Master of Engineering is offered in our department to formulate one or more project ideas that the incoming students will have to choose from. We list below the titles and faculty advisor for these capstone choices in the area. Depending on the number of enrolled students in the area, we may run only a subset of these project ideas.

Project 1 Title - FabSense (advisor Prof. Eric Paulos)
Description - Empower everyday shop and hand tools to be in conversation with the emerging landscape of digital fabrication hardware Keywords: Machine Learning, Python, Inertial Measurement Unit, Fabrication

The push for computational fabrication has left the important landscape of our everyday hand tools from working in concert and conversation with the world of digital fabrication. How can smart, low-cost, non-invasive sensing, and advances in computation be seamlessly integrated to provide a more reflective, interactive, and powerful making ecosystem. We feel there is a growing need to empower everyday shop and hand tools to be in conversation with the emerging landscape of digital fabrication hardware. Our plan is to use finger worn sensors to assist in tutorial construction, training, and verification of hands-on construction tasks. Making is a process filled with not just fabrication equipment and digital technologies but a wealth of hand tools and very analog actions. We envision tremendous value in designing experiences and interfaces around the these hand tools that enriches their experience, increases their value to the making process, and beings them into conversation with digital fabrication tools all while maintaining the important characteristics of their analog nature.
Project 2 Title - Flixels (advisor Prof. Eric Paulos)
Description - Flixels are coordinated swarms of quadcopters with programable lights. As flying pixels, they collectively form airborne, scalable, dynamic, interactive, deformable, sensing, displays. They can be programed to communicate messages, respond to sensed data (i.e. traffic, air quality, fault lines, underground subways, etc), redirect and navigate people, form conceptualized physical building outlines within cities, participate in gameplay with people (i.e. keeping score, de-marking boundaries, and augmenting field and street games with lights and sounds), be a novel kinetic visual expressive medium, interact with people (i.e. react as waves or particles when people gesture against them), and empower communities to message and 'tag' public and private spaces in real-time. Through a novel interface, swarms of quadcopters can be programed to perform, sense, or respond. Flixels leverage advanced robotic path planning, computer graphics, vision, and animation techniques to create an extremely novel, visually expressive system for public use. Flixels can form 'displays' of any shape or curvature and exploit motion as visual and communication elements. They allow unique imagery from different viewpoints. While battery life is still a limiting factor, flying 25+ quadcopters for 10-30 minutes are achievable ranges for exploring and experiencing the fascinating and expressive landscape of Flixels. With additional robotic planning this limit can be extended, broadening the scope and design landscape for Flixels.

Project 3 Title - Bio-Electric Hybrids (advisor Prof. Eric Paulos)
Description - This project is focused on the intersection of three fundamental emerging movements within the culture of technology: mobile platforms, sensing, and biology. More specifically, we propose to study, design, and develop, a new area of mobile sensing using biomarkers as sensor input. While we envision a broad range of applications, the initial driving platform is citizen science. Mobile phones provide a flexible, networked, user interface. Both in our own work and that or others, novel sensing has been proposed and developed for a range of inferencing and citizen science contexts. We claim that recent developments in the use of novel, low-cost biological materials and methods for sensing are significant and important new research areas for HCI. One challenge is in the design and integration of these biomarkers into electronic digital systems. In this proposal we will initiate and develop fundamental research into this hybrid space of low-cost personal bio-sensors integrated into mobile systems.
Project 4 Title - Programmable Materials: Magnetic Sketching (advisor Prof. Eric Paulos)
Description - Interactive experiences have be rapidly moving off of our desktop and onto our laps (pads), hands (smartphones), wrists, (smartwatches), and walls (smartboards). While each of these unique form factors bring with them new challenges and opportunities for designers, the interaction metaphors and existing prototyping tools remain largely derivative of prior static, screen-based themes. In this project we explore Magnetic Sketching as a new technique for rapidly exploring kinetic interactive designs using a broad new range of novel materials. We can magnetically actuate non-ferrous materials by infusing them with ferrofluid or iron filings, which are both low-cost and readily available chemicals. This novel and accessible design method enables designers to freely explore and sketch unique material motions and behaviors. With this technique, these typically non-magnetic materials can be moved without additional components, wires, interconnects, or heating. Finally, we highlight a range of designerly inspired potential applications through a series of examples and discuss future usage.
Project 5 Title - Sensr: Citizen Science for All (advisor Prof. Eric Paulos)
Description - Build, deploy, and study a range of novel, accurate air quality technologies within specific community groups and stakeholders to inspire 'new ways of seeing' understanding, interpreting, and taking action to improve our world through novel technology, community engagement, sensing platforms, and crowd sourcing tools. Provide new cooperative and collaborative approaches to problem solving across a variety of expert practitioners including environmental, computer, and social scientists, atmospheric chemists, environmental health organizations such as the EPA, urban planners, local/national governments, & nonprofits. This work focuses on the development of a new citizen science campaign authoring app.

Technical Courses

Fall 2015 DRAFT

Spring 2016 DRAFT

Note: The courses listed here are not guaranteed to be offered, and the course schedule may change without notice. Refer to the UC Berkeley Course Schedule for further enrollment information.

Capstone Projects

A unique and important feature of the Berkeley Masters of Engineering is the capstone project experience. You will join a team of 3-5 students and pursue a specific problem or opportunity that can be addressed by technology, and gain direct experience in applying the skills you learn in your leadership courses.

Past and current EECS capstone projects

Integrated Circuits

Report guidelines

The Fung Institute and your capstone course staff will guide you through the leadership requirements and general guidelines for the project, while your capstone faculty advisor will guide you through the technical aspects of the project.

A few reminders in terms of general guidelines:

Filing guidelines

Common Forms

There are numerous forms that you will need to fill out during your two semesters at UC Berkeley. The forms below are ONLY for the EECS department. Other offices on campus will notify you of important forms that you need to complete with them.

Degree Planning Form – Choose your technical courses from this Technical Courses page and download the form, meet with your faculty advisor before classes begin, have him sign the form, and then turn in the form to Breanne Tcheng, your Masters Student Services Advisor, in 205 Cory Hall by the end of the second week of classes.

Advancement to Candidacy – To inform the University that you are prepared to graduate, you must complete the courses listed on your Degree Planning Form and Breanne Tcheng will submit the Advancement to Candidacy form for you. If you decide to take different courses from your original Degree Planning Form, then please submit another one to Breanne by the end of your second week of classes in Spring.

Add/Drop Courses – If you need to add or drop a course (or change the number of units or grading option) after the second week of classes each semester, you must complete this Add/Drop form, get any necessary instructor signatures, have your faculty adviser sign, and submit it to Breanne Tcheng in 205 Cory. She can immediately fulfill the request and your CARS account will be billed accordingly.

Faculty Advisor

Your faculty advisor is available to you throughout your degree program to help you succeed academically. There is one faculty advisor for each area of concentration.

Student Services Advisor

Your student services advisor is also available to you throughout your degree program to help you with all aspects of your experience at UC Berkeley.

You all have one advisor, Breanne Tcheng. Her office is located in 205 Cory Hall and you can stop by anytime M-F 9am-noon, 1pm-4pm. She will also hold specific office hours for M.Eng. students at 2150 Shattuck Street upon request. You can also email (btcheng@eecs) or call her (510-643-8107).

It is a good idea to go to her with all of your questions and she will be able to either answer the question herself or she can let you know where to go to get the answer or assistance you need. Please make sure that she always has your most updated contact information as she will be emailing you very important information and announcements.

Fung Institute

The Fung Institute coordinates the M.Eng. program for the College of Engineering and is responsible for the leadership courses and capstone projects. If you have questions regarding these aspects of your degree program, please contact Beth Hoch Leven at bethhoch@berkeley.edu.

International Students

Many of our admitted students in the MEng program are international students. For information about visas, please contact the International Office. Be sure to update your email address with the International Office as well as the EECS department.

Contacts

Please first consult our Graduate Admissions - Frequently Asked Questions section for your question to be answered the most quickly.

Fung Institute

Beth Hoch Leven
Director, Academic Affairs
Fung Institute, UC Berkeley
Office 230A Blum Hall
Email: bethhoch@berkeley.edu
Phone: 510.664.4587

Contact Beth regarding leadership courses, capstone integration, and information about the College of Engineering.

Julie McShane
Associate Director, Career Services
Fung Institute, UC Berkeley
Office 230C Blum Hall
Email: jmcshane@berkeley.edu
Phone: 510.664.4593

Contact Julie for career services assistance.

EECS

Breanne Tcheng
Masters Student Services Advisor
205 Cory Hall
Email for Admissions: GradAdmissions@eecs.berkeley.edu
Email for Current Students: btcheng@eecs.berkeley.edu (emails sent to btcheng@eecs regarding admissions will be forwarded to Gradadmissions@eecs and will be sent to the end of the queue. Please email Gradadmissions@eecs directly for fastest service.)

Contact Breanne regarding EECS technical course requirements, faculty advisors, and degree completion requirements.

Professor George Necula
Contact Professor Necula for general capstone project inquiries. (For technical questions, contact capstone project advisors.)

International Office

2299 Piedmont Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94720-2321
Email: InternationalOffice@berkeley.edu
Phone: 510.642.2818
Website: http://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu/

Contact the International Office regarding visa information.