EECS Joint Colloquium Distinguished Lecture Series
     
 

Monday, March 08, 2004
430-438 Soda Hall, Wozniak Lounge
1:00-2:30 p.m.

Manolis Kellis

MIT

 
 

Computational Genomics: Genes, Regulation, Evolution

 

Abstract:

   

Manolis Kellis works on the computational foundations of genomics, specifically new methods for discovering biological signals using multiple species comparisons. He has focused in the areas of (1) the automatic alignment of multiple genomes, using a graph theoretic framework to determine orthologous genes as well as gene duplication and loss events, (2) the identification of protein- coding genes, using a classification approach based on their patterns of nucleotide change, (3) the de-novo discovery of genome-wide regulatory motifs that does not require prior biological knowledge, and (4) the elucidation of combinatorial interactions between regulatory motifs. He applies these methods to analyze four complete species of yeast, leading to (a) the largest re-annotation of the yeast genome since its original sequencing, (b) the discovery of nearly all previously known regulatory motifs and a similar number of novel motifs, and (c) the first global analysis of eukaryotic evolution across multiple species revealing specific regions of rapid evolutionary change.

    Biography:
   

Manolis Kellis works on applying computational methods to understanding biological signals. His thesis developed new methods for discovering biological signals using multiple species comparisons. He is currently post-doctoral fellow with Eric Lander at the MIT / Broad Institute Center for Genome Research.