EECS Joint Colloquium Distinguished Lecture Series
     
 

Wednesday, September 4, 2002
Hewlett Packard Auditorium, 306 Soda Hall
4:00-5:00 p.m.

Professor Theodore Van Duzer

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, U.C. Berkeley

Distinguished Lecturer for 2001-2002
IEEE Council on Superconductivity

 
 

Applications of Unique Superconductor Quantum Phenomena in Electronics

 

Abstract:

   

Some of the unique macroscopic quantum properties of superconductivity will be reviewed, and their applications in electronics will be explained. These include several well-established applications: detectors for radio astronomy used in most radio telescopes; the volt standard developed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST); sharp superconducting filters for cellular base stations now deployed in hundreds of locations; instrumentation for ultra-weak magnetic fields using the superconducting quantum interference detector (SQUID). Other highly developed applications are nearing acceptance, including SQUID magnetocardiography and magnetoencephalography, and high-resolution, high-frequency, analog-to-digital conversion. The status and prospects of single-flux-quantum 50-100 GHz digital integrated circuits for signal processing and computation will be reviewed. Comments will be given on current research directions in superconductor electronics, including quantum computing.

    Biography:
   

Prof. Van Duzer obtained his formal education at Rutgers University (BS), UCLA (MS) and UC Berkeley (PhD). He is currently a Professor in the Graduate School School in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at Berkeley. He is co-author of two texts: Fields and Waves in Communication Electronics (with S. Ramo and J. R. Whinnery) and Principles of Superconductive Devices and Circuits (with C. W. Turner). He is a Life Fellow of the IEEE, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, recipient of the Berkeley Citation and the IEEE/CSC Award for significant and Continuing Contributions to Applied Superconductivity. He has led a research group in superconductive electronics since 1968, including both devices and circuits. They devised novel Josephson junction device configurations and demonstrated both voltage-state and single-flux-quantum digital circuits operating in the high multi-gigahertz range (up to 20 Gb/s). His group has developed the nationís most versatile superconducting niobium integrated circuit process line. Present research includes hybrid superconductor/semiconductor systems for memory as well as single-flux-quantum digital circuits for operation at 50 GHz. His group is collaborating to provide superconductive circuits that cannot be made elsewhere. Recent work has demonstrated a new form of Josephson junction, which offers great potential for ultra-high speed single-flux-quantum digital circuits. EMAIL:vanduzer@eecs.berkeley.edu